Extracts of Falls City, Nebraska Newspapers


The Globe-Journal, January 19, 1878

One of the twin babes of Mrs. Aug. Schoenheit died of whooping cough on Tuesday night last.


The Globe-Journal, January 26, 1878

Little Maud, twin sister of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Schoenheit which they buried last week died on last Saturday morning.


The Journal, January 28, 1882

Died

At his home in Ohio precinct, Richardson Co. Neb., of dropsy of the chest on Tuesday evening Jan 17th, 1882, William G. Goolsby, aged 63 years 10 months and 10 days.

He was born in White Co. Tennessee on the 20th day of February 1818, and removed to Andrew Co. Missouri in 1840 and from there to Richardson Co. Neb. in 1856.   He died as he lived a true and devoted Christian, and was conscious to the last.   He leaves a widow and nine children, all of whom attended the funeral except one daughter.  There were forty grand children and four great grand children present at the funeral, the services being conducted by Rev. R. Taylor, thirty-four carriages besides a large number of persons on foot joined in the funeral procession.


The Journal, August 31, 1883

ISAAC CROOK

Personal Characteristics Given by
an Old Friend.

In the death of Uncle Isaac Crook the country has lost one of its best and oldest inhabitants. One by one the early subduers of the wilderness are going away, and it will not be many years until there will be none left. The writer of this sketch has known the subject of it now more than twenty five years, and I am unwilling to let the event of his demise go by without giving expression to the personal sorrow and regret with which I am oppressed in parting with a man who has uniformly been my friend for a quarter of a century. I very well remember the bright day in May, 1858, when I first met Uncle Ike, as he was then and ever after familiarly know.

There were but few people in the country, and all about us was silence and vacancy, with only now and then a settler by the Muddy and the Nemahas. The beautiful prairies, carpeted everywhere with a green luxuriance, seemed to wear a perpetual smile, as though God when he made them had smiled upon His work, and the smile was yet upon the country.

At that time Mr. Crook had reached the prime of a vigorous manhood, while I was a youth whose face was guiltless ofr either a beard or a razor.

The intervening years have wrought some change in that particular, but they have lessened none in the least my kindly regard for the man, brusk, odd and peculiar though he was, who stood my friend in the day of small things.

He was treasurer of the county at the time of which I speak, and had been for some years before, and continued to hold the office by election of the people till the latter part of the year 1864. His administration of the trust committed to his care was honorable and just, fully meeting the approbation of his fellow citizens. Isaac Crook was not an educated man, but he was an honest man; he had nothing of the polish which refined and polite society gives, but he had as warm a heart in his old breast as ever beat in the bosom of man.

There are those yet hungering in this county who remember the hard experiences of 1860, that year of drouth and failure. The hot sun and winds scorched and burned up almost entirely all the crops in the country, leaving the people scarcely enough to pull through the following winter, and nothing with which to commence the next year. It was then that Uncle Isaac exhibited the sterling, generous manhood that was in him. In the spring of 1861 he converted every available dollar he had into seed wheat and distributed it among the most needy in the county, exacting in return only a like amount out of the crops to be raised therefrom. There were many men in the county then who had more means than he, and who no doubt enjoyed many laughs at the oddities of our old friend; but they were not with him in the great and generous enterprise. In that he stood alone. The full measure of the noble act, its significance and importance, can hardly be understood and appreciated by a people who never suffered a like experience. It must be viewed in the light of the destitute surroundings of the people then; of their illy fed families, half-clad wives and children, the girls and boys of whom are men and women now, to be applauded as it justly deserves. The old man's life was full of such acts. They were characteristic of him, though not paraded by him; indeed the effect of many such was often marred by the careless disregard of their author of public sentiment concerning the ordinary amenities of life. That he had faults in common with the balance of humanity, is a fact; but they were only the faults of a man. We all have something that others call faults or shortcomings, and this is the fate of all the race. Indeed, a man would not be a part of the universal family if he had none. I don't think I should like a fellow who is so perfect that he never sins; for an angel whom God has made and forgot to put in heaven, would not fit all around down here.

He lived to see the three or four hundred people in the county when he came swell into more than fifteen thousand prosperous and happy people; to see the wilderness converted into a garden, and a weak and sparsely settled territory grow into a great and widely expanded state. But he died away from home. This was a matter of regret to all his friends. It seems best and most fitting that one should die at home. The last recollections of this life ought to be associated with what we have loved best, and loved longest; and such are always found at home and amidst its household gods.

But he is at rest, and the flowers we scatter about the grave that is new, are those of a kindly remembrance.

R.


Died.

CROOK - At Eldorado Springs, Missouri, Wednesday, August 22nd, 1883, Isaac Crook, aged 72 years, 5 months, and 26 days.

Isaac Crook, or "Uncle Ike" as he was commonly called was one of the first settlers in Richardson county. As such he was identified with all of its earliest history and known and respected by all of the earlier inhabitants. He was born in Tenn., Feb. 27th, 1811. In 1842 he moved to Missouri and settled in Andrew county, where he lived until 1857, when he came to Richardson county Nebraska, and settled one mile north of Falls City on what is known as the Crook farm, and has been a continuous resident of the county ever since. For several years he was county treasurer, and made an honest and efficient officer. He leaves several brothers and sisters and a large family of children and grandchildren to mourn his loss. He was buried in Steele Cemetery, August 24, and was followed to the grave by a large number of relatives and friends. The funeral sermon will be preached at some future time, of which due notice will be given.


The Falls City Journal, February 10, 1887

Death of Judge Schoenheit

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August Schoenheit Loaded with Age and Honors Passes from Earth.

Died — At home in Falls City, Nebraska, on Saturday, February 5th, at 10 o'clock, p. m., Hon. August Schoenheit, aged 64 years, 10 months and 10 days.

Judge Schoenheit was born in Sax Coberg, Germany, March 26, 1822. He came to America when sixteen years of age, and learned carriage making, in Pennsylvania. In Seneca, Ohio in 1847, he was married to Miss Adeline Miller, who died fourteen years after having borne him three children, all of whom are living here. Mrs. J. A. Whitmore, and Lothair and August Schoenheit. He was admitted to the bar in Tiffin, Ohio, in 1856, and emigrated to the territory of Nebraska in 1860. He practiced law in Brownville and Omaha locating permanently in Falls City in 1864. He here married Miss Sarah A. Crook, who now mourns his loss. The children of this union were Augustus, Julian, William, Lillian, and Sarah. Judge Schoenheit has served in the Nebraska state senate, was for three terms mayor of Falls City, and in 1872 was liberal republican and democratic candidate for attorney general. In his profession he ranked high, being considered one of the best judges of law in the state. In character he was honest, open and guileless, and would share his last dollar with any comer. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church Monday afternoon, Rev. Hobbs officiating.


The Falls City Journal, December 18, 1891

DIED.

WHITAKER — Of cancer, at the residence of his sons in this city, Tuesday, December 15, 1891, J. H. Whitaker, aged 55 years, 10 months and 11 days.

Mr. Whitaker was born in Putnam county, Tennessee, February 4, 1836. He was married there in 1858, and resided there continuously until February, 1881, when he removed with his family to this city. In 1888 Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker returned to Tennessee and remained there until a week ago they arrived here.

The deceased is survived by a wife and nine children, three daughters and six sons, who reside in this vicinity. He also has two sisters living here, Mrs. Nancy Drake of Reserve and Mrs. Eliza Crook of Falls City.

He became a member of the Christian church in 1880, and has always lived a consistent religious life. His sickness began twelve months ago when a cancerous growth appeared above one of his eyes, and gradually spread, and undermining his health and causing his death.

The funeral was held from his sons residence Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev Burnworth preaching the sermon. A large concourse of friends attended. The Journal extends condolences to the bereaved family.


The Falls City Journal, December 25, 1891

DIED.

SCHOENHEIT — On Friday, December 18, 1891, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Schoenheit, aged 10 days.

The funeral occurred Saturday afternoon, December 19.

The JOURNAL extends sincere sympathy to the young parents who are thus sadly bereaved.


The Falls City Journal, December 8, 1893

DIED.

SCHOENHEIT — At the home of his mother, Sarah A. Schoenheit, in Falls City, Tuesday, December 5, 1893, of typhoid fever, William H. Schoenheit, aged 22 years, 1 months and 11 days.

The deceased was born in Falls City, July 24, 1871, and was a son of the late August Schoenheit. At the time of his death he was managing a drug store in Holton, Kas., under the firm name of W. H. Crook & Co., the deceased being the junior member of the firm. Prior to engaging in business at Holton, he conducted a drug store in Shubert about a year ago. He was a bright, energetic young man and popular among his associates. The fatal sickness attacked him at Holton and he was brought to his home in this city two weeks ago.

A half sister, Mrs. J. A. Whitmore, of Canton, Ill., a half-brother, Lothair Schoenheit, and a sister, Miss Sarah, and his mother, Mrs. Sarah A. Schoenheit, all of this city, survive the deceased.

The funeral was conducted from the family residences Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. Dr. J. C. Hobbs of Salem assisted by Revs. L. O. Ferguson and John Gallagher of this city, and was under the auspices of the local lodge of Knights of Pythias. The interment was in Steele's Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, June 1, 1894

Died.

CROOK At the residence of Samuel Wharton, near Morrill, Kas., Sunday, May 27, 1894. Mollie McKinney Crook, aged 33 years, 1 month and 5 days.

Mollie McKinney Crook, daughter of Patrick and Fanny McKinney, was born April 22, 1861, in Mitlin county, Penn. Her father was a soldier in the union army and died at Washington, D. C., June 14, 1865. She removed with her mother to Morrill, Brown county, Kansas, in the fall of 1875 and was married October 23, 1878 to Benjamin Crook Sr., at her step-father's house, Samuel Wharton, near Morrill, Kansas.

She leaves four children, Emery, Clara, Stanley, and Karl, aged 14, 11, 7 and 3 years receptively. She was a member of the United Brethren. She died happily in the faith of her Saviour and was lain to rest in Steele's cemetery, May 29, 1894. Funeral services conducted by Rev. Elza Martin of Falls City, Neb.

Sleep on Mollie
Take thy rest

Jesus called thee
He thought it best.

Contributed.


The Falls City Journal, November 28, 1901

Died.

Hattie A., wife of Elva Crook, died at her home one and one-half miles north of this city last Tuesday morning at the age of 20 years, 7 months and 1 day.

The deceased was born at Troy, N.Y., April 4th, 1881, and a few years ago removed with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Simmons to this city.

About two years ago she was married to Mr. Elva Crook. She was a young woman of excellent christian character, and her sudden death has brought to the young husband that deep grief that cannot be alleviated in any sense by words of human sympathy and yet many friends share his sorrow. Their sympathies go out to the young man who in the midst of the brightest of prospects has seen the angel of death enter the home where happiness abided and call hence the young wife who such a short time ago had started side by side with him along the way of life. Mrs. Crook also leaves an infant son.

The funeral was held yesterday afternoon from the Methodist church and was very largely attended by sorrowing friends. At the conclusion of the services the remains were laid to their last long rest in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Tribune, July 10, 1902

DEATH OF SARAH GILBERT

Aged Resident of This City Has Been Called Away.

Mrs. Sarah Gilbert died at the home of her grandson, John A. Crook, on Tuesday morning at the age of 65 years, 6 months and 10 days. Mrs. Gilbert's final illness was of long duration and all during that time her wide circle of friends and acquaintances trusted that in the wisdom of the God she had served so faithfully her life might be spared yet a little while. But it was His will that she be called to her reward and she passed away triumphant in the faith.

Sarah J. Payton, was born at Muncie, Indiana, December 28, 1836. Here she grew to womanhood and on March 4, 1851, she was married to Anthony Worley. In February, 1862, Mr. Worley died and in 1865 the deceased was married to Mr. Edward Gilbert. For two years after their marriage they lived in Illinois and then came to Nebraska, living in this City since. Edward Gilbert departed this life about three years ago. Mrs. Gilbert leaves but one child, Mrs. W. H. Crook, of this city and it is with heartfelt sincerity that friends come foreward at this time to speak the word of sympathy and express sorrow that is genuine and heartfelt. This sympathy is also shared by three brothers and one sister, the later, Mrs. Reeves, although an aged and feeble woman, having come from Lenox, Iowa, to be present at the funeral. Two nieces, Mrs. Ridenour of Woodhull, Ill. and Mrs. Kenagy of Bluffton, Indiana, and Mrs. George Dalby of Coin, Iowa, were also present.

The christian character of Sarah Gilbert was of the most beautiful type. It was the deep rooted faith, the unswerving trust of which good works are begotten. She found in her religion the sure anchor of all hope and whenever trouble came and sorrow oppressed, it was the kindly light that lead her and enabled her by example and precept to so let her light shine before those who were associated with her that they seeing her good example might profit there by. And as her faith in God sustained her through life, it was the rod and staff that comforted her when she went down the valley and shadow of death.

Her funeral was held yesterday after noon at the home of John Crook, the services being conducted by Rev. Moody and Rev. Alexander. there were a large number of friends of the deceased and of the family present and with sorrowing hearts they paid their last respects to their departed friend. At the conclusion of the serviced the remains were borne to Steele cemetery and there left to await the trumpet that shall bid those who sleep to awake on the resurrection morn.


The Falls City Tribune, January 1, 1909

A PIONEER GONE

———

JESSE CROOK, COUNTY'S OLDEST
CITIZEN, IS GONE

———

Died at His Home in This City Thursday at the Ripe Old Age of Eighty-two Years

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In White county, state of Tennessee, on the 12th day of September, 1826, Jesse Crook was born. He was married to Miss Eliza Whitaker on the 28th day of February, 1846, of which union there were born the following children: Jno. Crook, who died in 1867, at the age of 21 years and Wm. H. Crook and Sarah E. Wilhite, both of this city.

Imagine if you can Richardson county as it was in August, 1854, when Mr. Crook, John A. Singleton, William Roberts and Thos. Hare first drove into it. These gentlemen had crossed the river at Iowa Point and drove through Kansas, coming into the county south of where Salem now is. Aside from the wigwams of the Indians there was not a human habitation in the county. The far fields of prairie grass were unscared by the plow and no fence fettered the rolling waste. Congress had in the May previous passed the territorial act and had opened the land to settlement. Even at that early day these young adventurers felt the spell of the brooding future and sought their homes amid the primal fields.

Mr. Roberts discovered what he termed a good mill site on the Nemaha near Salem and founded that town. It must have required some imagination to discover a mill site in a land without grain, without people. But the tread of coming thousands could be heard in the silence of the prairies and the ears of the pioneer are acute.

Uncle Jesse always like the trees and he choose a home at what he termed "Archer" a few miles north of Falls City beside the Muddy creek. To this land he removed his family from Missouri the following spring.

Life was not easy in those early days. It must have been very lonely without neighbors; it must have been very hard, this home making, without lumber, save the trees that skirted the river. Farming without implements, raising crops without railroads to reach the markets, raising families without schools are things we hear but know not of. For that was "the beginning of things." the days of fulfillment and comfort we owe to those who in an early day endured hardship and privation such as did the lovable old gentleman who was but is no more.

Everyone knew everyone else and the advent of a stranger, even at the farthest end of the county, was a very exciting incident. Everyone spoke to and visited everyone else, and from such use was bred the habit of Mr. Crook to speak kindly to every man, woman and child that he met, whether they enjoyed his acquaintence or not.

"Archer" was made the county seat through the influence of Uncle Jesse, and I have no doubt that the eyes of youth saw visions of a great future for his little town.

But dreams do not always come true, and time saw little houses grow on the sloping hillside to the south that the pioneers spoke of as Falls City. And so, in 1857 Mr. Crook transferred his residence and his loyalty to the coming metropolis, there to remain loved by everybody until the tired old eyes closed on the scenes of his struggles and opened again in the land of reward.

It is regretable that the real history of our county is being buried with such men as Mr. Crook. We should have some one who could perpetuate the story, for it is worth the telling. But we are so busy with the affairs made possible by such men as he, that we have no time to pause and learn. Just take it for granted that what is - is and that what was - is past.

The funeral was held at the family residence on Saturday morning last. A great throng were in attendance to pay their last respects to the memory of the departed. I thought, as they bore him away, that if a city were capable of human emotions that surely Falls City would miss him sorely for it had known him when both were young, and through the years of more than half a century they had kept step side by side.

In the arms of the soil he knew in its virgin state, Uncle Jesse is sleeping.

Peace to his ashes.


The Falls City Journal, August 20, 1910

Mrs. Eliza Crook Dead

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Grandma Crook, as she was known by all, died at her home Friday night at eleven o'clock, of cancer. Mrs. Crook has been a patient sufferer and was surrounded by loving friends and relatives until the end came. She had reached the age of 80 years, 3 months and 20 days.

The funeral will be held from the family residence Sunday morning at 9 o'clock. Rev. Brooks will have charge of the funeral services. The Interment to take place in the family lot at the Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August 22, 1910

Mrs. Eliza Crook.

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The funeral service of Mrs. Eliza Crook was held from her late residence on Sunday morning at ten o'clock. The Rev. Brooks of the M. E. church officiating. Many old time friends gathered to pay their last respects to the woman who had lived the longest in Richardson county at the time of her death of any of its inhabitants. The interment was in Steele cemetery beside her husband, Jesse Crook, who preceeded her there one year and eight months ago.

Eliza Whitaker was born May 1st, 1830 in North Carolina and died at Falls City, Nebraska, August 19, 1910. She moved to Cookville, Tenn., with her parents when a small girl and there she met and married Jesse Crook in the year 1846. In 1853 Mr. Crook got the Nebraska fever and and along with a number of his relatives and neighbors, among them Wm. Goolsby, Fargus Pollard, Elijah Mitchell, John Crook and half a dozen others started by ox team to Nebraska in October, 1853. Mrs. Crook drove one of her husbands teams that contained their three children, John, Sarah and William H. and the cooking utensils and supplies.

On reaching Andrew county Missouri, they discovered much to their regret, that the negotiations with the Indians had not been completed and that the Indian title had not yet been extinguished, Nebraska was not opened for settlement for eighteen months after their arrival in Missouri and they remained in that state. In the fall of 1854 the Nebraska country was opened for settlement and Mr. Crook and a party came over to look over the land. Mr. Crook selected for himself the land on which Nap'l DeMers now resides and in 1855 the family removed to that homestead where they resided before moving to Falls City.

Mrs. Crook's husband was an active man. He built several houses in town and opened up and improved several farms in the immediate vicinity of Falls City. The activity on the part of her husband required Mrs. Crook also to be active as the numerous moves and running a hotel gave her plenty to do.

In the early days of the settlement of the country, there were real dangers to be encountered, such as Indians, drouth and famine. Lack of something to eat as the greatest danger to poor settlers, many of them were so poor that they had to be helped over the hard winters and the generous impulses of Mr. and Mrs. Crook caused them to befriend many of the early settlers in this way. Mrs. Crook became known far and wide over the country as one of the best cooks in it and one of its most hospitable citizens.

She was by the mutual consent of the early day matrons put in charge of the cooking arrangements at public picnics, at house raisings, at the opening of a bridge across a stream or the building of a court house or a church or on any occasion where the settlers came together for a celebration, Aunt Eliza Crook was there doing what she could to make them happy by giving them good things to eat.

Her many friends and relatives knew that the latch string to her door hung on the outside to all of them every day in the week, and there was no one in Richardson county with a larger relationship. The early settlers from Tennessee nearly all remained established in this county and by marriage became related, so that the Tennesseeans as they are called to this day, are the largest group of people related by marriage or otherwise in this county.

At the funeral of Mrs. Crook who was about the earliest settle around Falls City was Frank Leachman, the first white child born in the county. Mrs. Crook was present and had assisted at his arrival in this world and it was a fitting tribute to her memory that he followed her remains to the cemetery and saw them returned to mother earth. Of Mrs. Crook's three children two survive, namely: Mrs. Sarah Wilhite and W. H. Crook, both of this city. Her son John died in 1868.

Mrs. Crook probably lived longer on the townsite of Falls City than any person ever in it, and no one was engaged in the active duties of life for a longer time here. a few years ago together with her husband a home was made in a cottage in the same block with their son, William H. Crook and that marked the end of their active career.

They lived quietly there and both enjoyed the rest. For several years Mrs. Crook has suffered considerably with her ailments, occasioned by the weight of years, as she was over 80 years old and when death came at last to relieve her he was not an unwelcomed guest as her household was in order and her faith firm in the life to come.


The Falls City Tribune, August 26, 1910

DEATH OF AN EARLY SETTLER

—————

Death of Mrs. Eliza Crook
Friday, Aug. 9th.

—————

She Came to Richardson County in 1854 and Was Falls City's Oldest Resident

———

Mrs. Eliza Crook passed away Friday, August 19, 1910. For a long time she had not been in the best of health, and for the past few weeks she grew much worse and her friends knew the end was near. she was a patient sufferer of that dreaded disease, cancer.

Death no matter to whom, or in what form it comes always brings with it the tear of sorrow and the sigh of grief, but it is not always that a single visitation of the destroyer brings such widespread regret or draws forth so many expressions of that regret. This wide spread, outspoken expression of sorrow was the highest tribute that the community could pay to the character and worth of the departed. And through years of close association the people of this city has come to know Mrs. Crook so well, to so appreciate her womanly qualities, and so come under the influence of her christian character as to feel that this tribute was due her.

True womanhood finds its highest exemplification in the home, and it was here that the true nobility of she who has beenccalled away was most beautifully shown. She was always a loving mother to her children and grandchildren. But this dear old lady, who had lived such a righteous and noble life, and whose hands have always been busy is now at eternal rest.

Eliza Whitaker was born May 1, 1830 in North Carolina. When a very small girl she moved with her parents to Tennessee. And on February 28, 1846, she was married to Jesse Crook, of which union the following children were born: John Crook, who died in 1867 at the age of twenty-one years, and Wm. H. Crook and Sarah E. Wilhite, both of this city.

In 1853 Mr. and Mrs. Crook started for Nebraska. They were accompanied by a number of relatives and neighbors and their three children. On reaching Andrew county, Missouri, they discovered that the negotiations with the Indians had not been completed and that the Indian title had not yet been extinguished. Nebraska was not opened for settlement for eighteen months after their arrival in Missouri and they remained in that state. In 1854 they settled on the old homestead, where they lived until moving to this city.

For many years she and her husband were engaged in running a hotel in Falls City. In this way she was know to most of the early settlers of the county. Mrs. Crook probably lived longer on the townsite of Falls City than any person ever in it, and no one was engaged in the active duties of life for a longer number of years. It was only a few years ago that she and her husband moved to a neat little cottage in the west part of town to enjoy a few years of rest and recreation and here her tired eyes closed on the scene of her struggles and opened again in the land of reward.

The funeral services were held from the residence on Sunday morning at nine o'clock, conducted by Rev. M. C. Brooks of the Methodist church. The remains were tenderly placed beside here husband, who died on Christmas day, 1908.


The Falls City Journal, July 31, 1912

BURNED TO DEATH

G. J. CROOK VICTIM OF GASOLINE EXPLOSION

LIVED ONLY 3 HOURS

One of Oldest and Best Known Citizens in County Ex-Postmaster

———

G. J. Crook, a well known and most highly respected business man of this city, met his death by gasoline explosion this morning. At 5 o'clock Mr. Crook went to the kitchen to start the gasoline range when a few minutes later the explosion took place. Mrs. Crook was dressing when she heard the explosion and ran to the kitchen and found the room in flames. She turned to the telephone and called the fire company. Mr. Crook was so badly burned that he was almost unrecognizable. The body from the waist to the crown of the head was burned to a crisp and his feet were also badly burned. He lived three hours after the accident occurred and did not regain consciousness.

It is supposed the range had sprung a leak and the room was filled with the gas and as soon as the match was lighted it caused the explosion. The walls of the kitchen and the furniture in the room are burned to a char.

Mr. Crook was one of the early inhabitants of this city, coming here with his parents when a small boy. He had reached the age of 61 years. He has been identified in business here in different ways, at present being the senior member of the real-estate firm of Crook and Redwood. He held the position as postmaster for seven years. The city losses a good citizen in the death of Mr. Crook and the sympathy of the entire community is extended to Mrs. Crook and the family at this sad hour.


The Falls City Journal, November 24, 1915

Goolsby

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Florence, the five year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dave Goolsby, passed away at the family home on Tuesday afternoon about three o'clock.  Diphtheria wa the cause of her death.  Antitoxin was administered but too late to take effect.  the child was a bright little Miss and loved by all who knew her.

The family was placed under quarantine Monday and they have the sympathy of their friends and neighbors in the loss of their little one.


The Falls City Journal, February 14, 1917

POLLARD

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Mrs. Sara Pollard died at her home near Humboldt Monday afternoon.   She is one of the Pioneer Nebraskans, having come from Tennessee, with a colony to Nebraska April 17, 1855, with her husband who pre-empted a claim near Humboldt, which she continued to make her home during these years.  The husband went north during the early sixties to fight the Indians, and never returned.  His death occurred in 1863.   Mrs. Pollard reached her 82d. year in January 1917.  She is survived by six children, Perry and Isaac with whom she made her home, Mrs. Eva Ray and Columbus Pollard of Humboldt; Mrs. Jane Kountz of Eldorado, Jan., and Jesse Pollard of Jewell county, Kan.   the funeral was held from the residence at 2 p. m., today.


The Falls City Journal, April 11, 1917

CROOK

———

Mrs. B. F. Crook died at her home in Plattsmouth, Neb., Tuesday April 10, at the age of 52 years, 10 months and 15 days. The body will be brought to Falls City for burial on Thursday, arriving over the Missouri Pacific R. R. at 12:15 and the funeral service will follow at the Christian church at 1:30 p.m., Thursday. Interment in Steele cemetery.

Mrs. Crook was a former resident of Richardson county, having made her home with her family near Salem, Neb., until a few years ago when they moved near Plattsmouth. Her daughters, Mrs. Ike Smith and Mrs. Stalder living near Salem, were at their mother's bedside when the end came. The family have the sympathy of their many friends over the county in this hour of grief and sorrow.


The Falls City Journal, June 21, 1920

DEATH OF EARLY SETTLER

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ONE OF THE FIRST WOMEN TO PIONEER IN RICHARDSON CO. — A PROMINENT WOMEN IN MAKING ITS HISTORY

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Mrs. J. R. Wilhite Passed Away at Her Home Sunday, June 20, 1920

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When the news reached her many friends they were shocked beyond words, as they knew she was recovering nicely from her recent illness and had been able to be out driving in an automobile on Thursday. Saturday afternoon she suffered a relapse and a weak heart which resulted in death about 7 a.m. Her husband, J. R. Wilhite and daughter, Mrs. Abner McKee and other relatives were with her when the end came.

With her death one of the early pioneers and best known women in the county passed away. She has been a great factor in making the county history. She had a most wonderful memory and she could relate much of interest of the life and the early inhabitants and settlement of Richardson county.

She was active in all church, social and civic movements in the city even up to the late years of her life. She was known for her charity work which she did in a quite way and she was loved by the young as well as the older people and will be greatly missed from the community.

She is preceeded in death by the following children: August, Julius, William, and Lilie, Sidney (died in infancy).

The grand children, Brown Schoenheit, Miss Erma Schoenheit of Kansas City and David James McKee, one brother, W. H. Crook and a number of relatives survive, with a host of friends, who extend the deepest sympathies to the bereaved family.

Sarah E. Crook was born in Tennessee on March 2, 1849. When 6 years of age she came to Nebraska with her parents, Jesse Crook and wife, and settled in Richardson county; the Crooks who arrived here on April 17, 1855, being the third family to settle in this county. Jesse Crook entered a tract of land at a point one and one-half miles north of what later came to be the county seat of Richardson county and there established his home, becoming one of the substantial pioneer farmers of this county. Sarah E. Crook grew to womanhood on that pioneer farm and married Augustus Schoenheit, a former prominent attorney at Falls City, who died leaving his widow and three sons, now deceased, and a daughter, Mrs. Sallie McKee, the later of whom in now living in Paonia, Colo.

In October, 1898, Mrs. Schoenheit was united in marriage to Judge James R. Wilhite and is survived by him.

The funeral will be held at 2:30 Tuesday from the St. Thomas church. Rev. James Noble will be in charge of the service.

Mrs. Wilhites casket will not be opened in the church, but friends who wish to see her may call at the family residence. Interment to follow in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, April 18, 1921

CROOK

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Wm. Riley Crook died at Paonia, Colo, April 14, 1921.  He was born December 28, 1844, and was one of the early residents of Falls City, having served as deputy postmaster and postmaster in this city for several years during his residence here.  He was the brother of the late Jack Crook.

The body will be brought to this city on Burlington train No. 10, arriving in Falls City Wednesday, April 20, accompanied by Mrs. Crook and son Zeno.  The funeral will be held from the Methodist church Thursday, April 21, at 2:30 p. m., Rev. Reed officiating.  Pall bearers who will act are Frank Schiable, L. C. Madger, Dr. Boose, T. J. Gist, G. W. Schock, W. H. Maddox.

Interment will follow in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, November 19, 1923

DEATH CLAIMS VERDON FARMER

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John Grant Goolsby, Son of Richardson County Pioneer, Is Victim of Pneumonia.

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John Grant Goolsby, 58, native son of Richardson county and son of Mr. and Mrs. William G. Goolsby, one of the first five families to settle in the county, died at his home three miles east of Verdon at 1 a. m. today following an illness of several weeks suffering with pneumonia.  Funeral services in charge of Rev. Marchand of Barada, will be held from Tuesday at 2 p. m. and buried in the Maple Grove cemetery.

Deceased is survived by his wife, and three daughters, as follows; Misses Alice and Minnie, and Mrs. B. F. Randall, and sons Jesse and George Goolsby.  His mother, Mrs. Sarah Goolsby, is a resident of Nevada, Mo., and sisters, Mrs. Mary Davis of Burwell; Mrs. Ellen Smith of Verdon; Mrs. Emma Simpson of Barada; and brothers, Wilson and George Goolsby of Verdon and William Goolsby of Straussville.

Deceased had been engaged in the farming business all his life.


The Falls City Journal, January 4, 1924

MRS. HURST DIES AFTER OPERATION

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Former Prominent Falls City Woman Succumbs After Brief Illness at Omaha Hospital

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Mrs. E. K. Hurst, 34, prominent Falls City woman who for the past two years had been residing at Sioux Falls, S. D., died at the Methodist hospital in Omaha at 6:30 a. m., today following an operation. Her death had been expected momentarily for the past two days and her mother, Mrs. W. H. Crook, and brothers, Guy and W. A. Crook, in company with Dr. E. R. Hays drove to Omaha late last night to be at her bedside at the last moments.

Mrs. Hurst, who was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crook, Falls City pioneers, was one of the social leaders in the younger set when she and Mr. Hurst left Falls City for Sioux Falls more than two years ago. She was married to Ed K. Hurst about 11 years ago when the latter was principal of the high school. Both enjoyed enviable reputations here. Mr. Hurst, who served as a captain during the war, having been commander of the Falls City post of the American Legion as well as exalted ruler of the Elks lodge.

Mrs. Hurst was a native of Falls City, having been born here on August 19, 1889. She was a graduate of the Falls City high school in 1906.

Besides her husband she is survived by two sons, Edwin and Frederick; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crook of Falls City; three brothers, William A. and Guy of Falls City, and John, of Denver, and a sister, Mrs. Donald MacLeod of Sioux Falls, S. D.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.


The Falls City Journal, July 14, 1924

PIONEER DEAD; IN COUNTY 66 YEARS

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Mrs. Sarah E. Goolsby Was One of Earliest Settlers, Coming in 1858; Funeral Today.

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Mrs. Sarah E. Goolsby, 85, a resident of Richardson county since 1858, died at her home at Verdon Sunday at 1 a.m.  Her funeral was to be held at 2:30 today with the Rev. C. E. Austin in charge of services and burial at Maple Grove cemetery, Verdon.

Mrs. Goolsby, one of the earliest pioneers of Richardson county, was born in Indiana on November 29, 1838, and came to Richardson county at the age of 20.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Zadock Stephenson, also natives of Indiana.

She was married to William C. Goolsby on January 29, 1859, at Maryetta, Mo., just a year after her coming to Nebraska.  Her husband preceded her in death many years ago.

Mrs. Goolsby is survived by six children: Mrs. Nancy Davis of Burwell, Neb., and Mrs. Ellen Smith, William Goolsby, Wilson Goolsby, Mrs. M. H. Simpson and George Goolsby, all of Richardson county.  She also leaves three brothers, Zadock Stephenson of Raymond, Neb.; Jerome Stephenson of Fairmont, Neb., and F. C. Stephenson of Fairmont, Neb.; two sisters, Mrs. Lois Friend of Eureka, Mont., and Mrs. Sandy Robinson of Lincoln; 37 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.


The Falls City Journal, September 2, 1924

Mrs. A. E. Goolsby's Funeral Rites Today

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Mrs. A. E. Goolsby, 58, died at her home, 1023 McLean street, Sunday following an illness of two years from cancer.

She was born at Blufton, Ind., on February 3, 1865, the daughter of David C. and Delila Conklin, and was married to A. E. Goolsby on February 25, 1903.

Besides her husband, she is survived by a son, Alvin Davis; one brother, John Conklin of Blue Hill, Neb., and five sisters.

Funeral services were held at 2 p. m. today at the Methodist church, Rev. T. Porter Bennett officiating.  Burial was in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, January 1, 1925

W. H. Crook Confined at Home With Broken Arm

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W. H. Crook, pioneer merchant, who broke his left arm close up to the shoulder Tuesday evening by slipping on the ice at his home, is confined to his residence and will be for some time.  The injury is causing him much pain.  Mr. Crook is over 73 years of age and the broken member therefor heals slowly.


Falls City Daily News, June 9, 1927

Final tribute was paid to memory of W. H. Crook yesterday. Beloved Pioneer.

IN TRIBUTE TO MR. W. H. CROOK

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Deserved Eulogy, Written by Congressman Morehead, In Appreciation of Life Long Friend and County Pioneer.

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In the passing of the Hon. William H. Crook, Falls City and Richardson county loses one of its most beloved citizens and a real pioneer, he having been a resident of the county for more than seventy-one years.

Like his parents and ancestry before him, he was a native son of South and on his mother's side was a descendent of Robert E. Lee.

When he was but four years of age his parents, Jesse Crook and Eliza Whitaker Crook, with the true spirit of the real pioneers came from Tennessee and waited on the Missouri side of the river at Savannah until the treaty was signed with the Indians, allowing the white settlers on land which is now adjacent to Falls City, so William H. Crook's life has been woven into the development and making of Falls City and Richardson County, perhaps more than any other one man.

At an early age, he developed that initiative and thrift which brought him success in life. When but a mere boy, with every bit of money he earned he would buy a calf until eventually he had several hundred head of cattle ranging over the plains where Falls City now stands. As a boy, he was a servant of Uncle Sam, carrying the mail on horse back between Falls City, Brownville and Peru. In the winter those rides tested his courage to the utmost when the cold winds swept across the unbroken prairies and often his mother found it necessary to wrap his boots with heavy gunny sacks to keep his feet from freezing. In later years, he often referred with affection to Mrs. Catherine Hoppe, a pioneer woman of that day, who would watch for the boy mail carrier and give him cakes and delicacies to cheer him the rest of the way.

He attended school at Pawnee and when the school moved to Peru and made the State Normal, he went with it and finished his studies at the Peru Normal with men of the prominence of Col. Thos. J. Majors, and his brother, Wilson Majors, also our fellow citizen, Joseph H. Miles, his associates and friends for more than fifty years.

Engaging in business when a very young man, at the time of his death, he was regarded as having been in business longer than any other one man in the county. He was among the first to engage in the banking business and was cashier of the first bank in Falls City, and was still a director and stock-holder in the Richardson County Bank. He was also in the drug business and later with his close friend and business associate, Edwin S. Towle, was a pioneer in the clothing and hardware business. He has been actively engaged in the hardware business for the past thirty-eight years. In 1909, his son, W. A. Crook, bought out Mr. Towle's interest in the W. H. Crook & Company's store and since then, has been in partnership with his father. this institution holds the record of being in existence longer than any other retail business in Falls City.

It has been my pleasure to know Mr. Crook, personally and intimately for more than forty years. I always think of him in connection with Edwin Falloon, a prominent attorney in Falls City and an early settler of Richardson County; Clarence Gilliespie, George Abbott, Clay Davis, who edited the Falls City News for more than fifteen years; Robert Clegg, a prominent druggist and many others who were active in Democratic politics. He was elected to the Nebraska Legislature in 1885, when it seemed a waste of time for a man of his political affiliation to endeavor to be elected in this locality. But then as now, he was so thoroughly admired by the people, that they elected him in spite of his party being in the minority.

I never think of the name "Bill Crook," that name, so familiar with all the people of Southeastern Nebraska, that I fail to conoect the name of old James Ramsey who settled here in 1875, and two men were never closer and the friendship of Bill Crook and Jim Ramsey can be compared to that of Jonathan and David.

Since, my acquaintance with Mr. Crook, there has seldom been a month or a week for many years, that I haven't, in a business way as well as a social way, visited him in his place of business or his home and in that long acquaintance, I have never heard him speak ill of anyone. Being identified with the same political party, it was my pleasure to often discuss public questions with him, and when serving as governor of Nebraska, when I returned to my home in Falls City, I always visited him to discuss public and business questions. I found him always charitable, anxious to see our national, state and local affairs administered in such a way as would do the greatest good to the greatest number of people. His ideals in life were Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and last but not least, his close personal friend, William Jennings Bryan. He was such an admirer of Bryan, in his long political career, that no act of Mr. Bryan's was ever, by him, subject to criticism. Mr. Bryan and his wife made their home many times with Mr. Crook and family during their many visits to this county.

Mr. Crook was a great lover of nature and for that reason was identified with agriculture. He owned and operated several farms near Falls City and if he wasn't in his hardware store, one would be most sure to find him visiting one of his farms. He lived the simple, plain active business life, interested always in the building of Falls City, adding his mite to make a better government and to rearing a family that would be a credit to the community and nation.

Many, many times he had expressed a wish that when his active work was finished that he might pass to the Great Beyond, surrounded by his own family in his own home. When the final call came, his long expressed desire was fulfilled. His immediate family were all present on that bright balmy June day and with his window up in view of the great maple trees which he had planted with his own hands, when mere twigs, there came the songs of the birds he loved so well, and he was wafted away to his Eternal Resting place.

It is my good fortune to know the wife and companion of William H. Crook, Lydia Worley Crook, a woman whose untiring devotion, fidelity, and sterling qualities of womanhood helped him to success, and who survives him. They were married May 3, 1874, and to them were born four sons and two daughters. Preceeding him in death was the first son who died in infancy and three years ago, his daughter, Edna Crook Hurst, also his father, Jesse Crook, his mother, Eliza Whitaker Crook, his brother, John, and his sister, Sarah Crook Wilhite, wife of our esteemed fellow townsman, Judge James R. Wilhite. Besides his wife surviving him are his sons, John A. Crook of Denver; Will A. and Guy A. Crook of Falls City, and one daughter, Mrs. Donald E. MacLeod of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and one grand daughter, Mrs. Gordon E. Ambrose of St. Louis, Missouri and five grandsons, Edwin William and Frederick John Hurst, sons of E. K. and Edna Crook Hurst, William H. and Guy Harman, sons of Guy A. and Florence Harman Crook, and Donald Eugene MacLeod, Jr., son of Donald E. and Eliza Crook MacLeod and one niece, Sallie Schoenheit McKee, wife of Abner McKee of Paonia, Colorado. Four grandsons and two granddaughters are also dead, Esther Irene and John Dalby Crook, children of John A. and Minnie Dalby Crook; William A. Crook, Jr., son of William A. and Marion Kachelries Crook; Florence, daughter of Guy A. and Florence Harman Crook and infant twin sons of E. K. and Edna Crook Hurst.

In closing, I will say Bill Crook will be missed in Falls City and Richardson county. I shall remember him in the words of the poet, Eugene Field, in his Christmas poem, "Father called me William, mother called me will, sister called me Willie, but the fellers called me "Bill." And so ends a life in which the young men of the present generation may find a worthy example and an inspiration. To his family it is an incomparable legacy.


Falls City Daily News, June 9, 1927

Mrs. Abner McKee and little son, Abner, Jr., of Paonia, Colorado, were dinner guests Tuesday evening of their cousins, Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Whitaker and family. Mrs. McKee is remembered in Falls City as Miss Sallie Schoenheit. She was called to Falls City by the illness of her father, J. R. Wilhite.

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Mrs. Mamie MacLeod of Horton, Kansas, arrived here Tuesday, to attend the funeral of W. H. Crook, which took place at the family residence yesterday afternoon.

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J. R. Wilhite, who has been very ill for the past two weeks, is slowly improving. He is able to be up a part of the time.

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Mrs. Frank Eversole of Elk Creek is spending the week here with Mrs. W. H. Crook, having come on Sunday on account of the illness of Mr. Crook, who died that afternoon, and remaining over for the funeral, which occurred yesterday afternoon.

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Donald MacLeod will leave Saturday for his home in Sioux Falls, South Dakota after spending the week here. He was called to Falls City by the illness and death of Mrs. MacLeod's father, W. H. Crook.

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Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Hurst and sons, Edwin and Frederick, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, arrived here Tuesday evening, having driven the three hundred miles from that city to Falls City. They came to attend the funeral of W. H. Crook, held yesterday afternoon.


The Falls City Journal, January 30, 1928

PIONEER COUNTY RESIDENT DEAD

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Mrs. W. H. Crook Succumbs in South Dakota Following Short Illness

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Mrs. W. H. Crook, 71, pioneer county resident, died suddenly at 11:30 last night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Donald MacLeod of Sioux Falls, S. D. The cause of death is not known. She was taken ill late yesterday morning.

Mrs. Crook was born July 24, 1857, at Illinois, Pa. At the age of 16 she moved to Falls City where she had resided for 54 years. In the year 1874 she was married to W. H. Crook also of Falls City.

Mrs. Crook's husband was a former representative to the state legislature from this district and a veteran hardware merchant.

Mrs. Crook is survived by three sons, John of Denver, Wm. A. and Guy Crook of Falls City and one daughter, Mrs. MacLeod. Her husband died last June of septic poisoning.

The body of Mrs. Crook will be brought to Falls City but no funeral arrangements have yet been made.


The Falls City Journal, January 31, 1928

Body of Mrs. W. H. Crook Brought Here

The body of Mrs. W. H. Crook, 71, pioneer county resident, who died suddenly at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Donald MacLeod of Sioux Falls, S. D. was brought here over the Missouri Pacific at noon today. Mr. and Mrs. MacLeod accompanied the body. The funeral party was met at Omaha by Wm. A. and Guy Crook of Falls City. Both are sons of Mrs. Crook. Mr. and Mrs. John Crook and Mrs. Gordon Ambrose of Denver, Colo., will arrive here tomorrow to attend the funeral service. John is the eldest son of Mrs. Crook. Mr. and Mrs. E. Hurst of Sioux Falls, S. D., are also expected to arrive tomorrow.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon with Rev. T. Porter Bennett of York, Nebr., officiating. Rev. Bennett was former pastor of the Methodist church here. The site of the funeral has not been selected. Burial in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, February 1, 1928

To Hold Services At Crook Residence

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Funeral services for Mrs. W. H. Crook, who died suddenly last Sunday, will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Crook residence, 2305 Towle street.

The pallbearers will be Bert Baker, Frank Schaible, Fred Graham, Harry Jenne, Will Schock, Jr., and Charles Stanton. The members of the Sorosis Club will be honorary pallbearers.

Members of the Hillcrest club and the following women will act as flower girls: Mrs. George Falter, Mrs. Fred DeWald, Mrs. Frank Hebenstreit, Mrs. S. D. Cowan, Mrs. J. C. Gillispie, Mrs. I. C. Maust, Mrs. E. R. Hays and Mrs. Madeleine Gist.

Rev. T. Porter Bennett of York, Neb., will officiate, assisted by Rev. J. W. Kirkpatrick, pastor of the Methodist church.


The Falls City Journal, March 11, 1929

LOCAL HOSTELRY OWNER SUCCUMBS

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Elnora Goolsby, 70, Lifetime Richardson Resident, Married Son of First Settlers.

Mrs. Elnora Goolsby, 70, life-long citizen of Richardson county and owner of the Goolsby hotel, sixth and Morton streets, passed away Sunday afternoon at the hotel following a lingering illness.

Born in Richardson county Nov. 28, 1858, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Allison, she was married to Ross Goolsby, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Goolsby, reported to have the distinction of being the county's first settlers.  Her husband succumbed about ten years ago.

She leaves one son, William Goolsby, Falls City, and one daughter, Mrs. A. J. Lowe, also a local resident, and seven granddaughters.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Tuesday at the hotel in charge of Rev. J. W. Kirkpatrick.  Burial in Maple Grove cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, April 7, 1930

Pioneer of Verdon Vicinity Succumbs

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Mrs. Eliza Edna Goolsby, 83, of the Verdon vicinity died yesterday of heart disease.   Mrs. Goolsby, the widow of the late George W. Goolsby, has lived at Verdon for the last 40 years.

Mrs. Goolsby was born in Marion county, Ohio, September 27, 1846.  Besides her husband, five children went to their graves before her.

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Maud Goolsby, Verdon, and Mrs. Nellie Veal, Ray, Colo., and one sister living at Buffalo, Wyoming.

Mrs. Goolsby was a member of the Congregational church and of the Knights and Ladies Security lodge.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the Congregational church at Verdon in charge of Rev. G. L. Shull.  Burial will be made in the Maple Grove cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August 23, 1932

Benjamin F. Crook Funeral Held Here

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Funeral services for Benjamin F. Crook, 74, who died Saturday at his home in Lincoln, were held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the local Christian church in charge of Rev. Wiley Pruett. Burial was made in Steele cemetery.

Mr. Crook, a son of the late John and Martha Crook, Richardson county pioneers, was born in 1857 near Salem. He grew to manhood here. In 1880 he was married to Alzada Harris and for 30 years after his marriage was engaged in farming and taught school. In 1910 he moved to Plattsmouth and later to Lincoln.

Mrs. Crook died in 1917. He is survived by six daughters, four sons, one sister and three brothers.


The Falls City Journal, February 23, 1933

Mrs. Goolsby, 80, Is Taken by Death

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Mrs. Catherine Goolsby, 80 years old, died at her home, 1704 Morton street, at 7 o'clock this morning after an illness of three weeks.

Mrs. Goolsby had been a resident of Falls City for the last 24 years.  She was born in Indiana September 10, 1852.  She was the widow of the late James M. Goolsby.

Mrs. Goolsby is survived by four sons, Alonzo Goolsby, Falls City; David and Elvin Goolsby, both of Auburn, and Mark Goolsby of Verdon, and a daughter, Mrs. Bertie Smith of Humboldt, survives.

The funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, at the Methodist church here.  the Rev. Carl G. Bader, pastor, will conduct the services.  Burial will be in Maple Grove cemetery northwest of Falls City.


The Falls City Journal, June 23, 1934

Lifetime Resident of County Expires

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Mrs. Eva Ray, 70, a resident of Richardson county her entire life, died at 9:30 o'clock this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Earl Marsh in Verdon following a long illness.

Mrs. Ray was born at Humboldt July 16, 1864, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tharagus Pollard, pioneers of that district. She was married at Humboldt in November, 1879 to A.C. Ray, who survives her.

Surviving besides the husband are two daughters, Mrs. Marsh, Verdon, and Mrs. Sarah Pullen, Torrington, Wyo.; two sons, Jesse Ray, Falls City and Ned Ray, Omaha; two brothers, Perry Pollard, Humboldt, and Jesse Pollard, Phillipsburg, Kas.; one sister, Mrs. Jane Kunze, Eldorado, Kas., and nine grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at Humboldt Monday afternoon with internment in the Lynchburg cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August 22, 1935

Widow of Former Postmaster Dies

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In failing health for some time, Mrs. Catherine Crook, 80, died of heart trouble this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. P. B. Weaver, 1910 Harlan street.

She was the widow of the late Jack Crook, former Falls City postmaster and farmer who was also in the real estate and loan business.

Mrs. Crook was born April 26, 1855, in Iowa and came to Richardson county in 1869.  She married November 18, 1872, and her husband passed away July 21, 1912.

Besides Mrs. Weaver, she leaves four sons, John W. Crook, Houston, Tex., Elva J. Crook, Orland, Calif., A. R. Crook, Fort Collins, Colo., and Miles A. Crook, Falls City; a half brother, George E. Martin, dean of the Kearney State Normal college, and a half-sister, Miss Anna Martin, a faculty member of the Nebraska City high school.

No funeral arrangements have been made.


The Falls City Journal, August 23, 1935

Mrs. Crook Rites Will Be Saturday

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Final rites will be conducted for Mrs. Mary Catherine Crook at 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon from the Methodist church with Rev. R. A. Trowbridge in charge.

Pallbearers will be Clare Foster, Frank Lichty, Lewis Davies, John Wiltse, Sr., I. B. Whitaker and Wallace Cully.

The Women's Relief corps will meet at the church and attend the funeral in a body, it was announced.

Burial will be in Steele cemetery.


The Journal, December 30, 1935

SUFFERS STROKE

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Mrs. J. G. Whitaker is in the Falls City hospital following a stroke of paralysis last evening at her home. The stroke affected Mrs. Whitaker's right side and she is reported doing as well as could be expected.


The Journal, December 31, 1935

The condition of Mrs. J. G. Whitaker, who suffered a stroke of paralysis Sunday night is reported improved today at the Falls City hospital.


The Journal, January 1, 1936

Mrs. Whitaker, 68, Claimed by Death

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Mrs. J. G. Whitaker, 2003 Abbott street, died at 9:15 o'clock last night at the Falls City hospital. She had been taken to the hospital following a paralytic stroke Sunday evening. She was 68 years old.

Born at Elwood, Kas., August 3, 1867, she was married at Reserve August 20, 1888.

The family farmed in the Falls City vicinity shortly after the marriage and later moved to Kansas. The returned to Falls City from Kansas City, Kas., 28 years ago and had resided here since. Mr. Whitaker is a well-known auctioneer.

Mrs. Whitaker is chiefly remembered by the people of Falls City for her work in helping needy families. Before organized relief first came to Richardson county, she was largely instrumental in providing clothing for scores of families.

Up to the time of her death, she still had a long list of families for which she supplied clothing such as she was able to collect among her friends.

Surviving besides her husband are two sons, Fred and Charles Whitaker, both of Falls City; two sisters, Mrs. Wesley Smith, Falls City, and Mrs. Jane Cochren, Bigelow, Mo., and one brother, W. T. Nutter, Falls City.

The body is at the Reavis and Macomber funeral home pending funeral arrangements.


The Journal, January 3, 1936

Services for Mrs. Whitaker Friday

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Funeral services for Mrs. J. G. Whitaker will be conducted at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon from the First Christian church with Rev. Wiley Pruett officiating, assisted by Rev. W. S. Lowe.

The body will be taken to the church at 1:15 to lie in state until the funeral hour.

Active pallbearers will be: Bryan Morris, Glenn Martin, Jim Birdsley, Ralph Jenne, Bayard Clark and Harry Simon.

Honorary pallbearers will include: E. H. Towle, W. R. Holt, George Prater, John Hutchings, Roy Daggett and Norman Forney.

Flower bearers will be: Mrs. Belle Marion, Mrs. George Prater, Mrs. Fred Colglazier, Mrs. Wiley Pruett, Mrs. E. E. Coatney, Mrs. Katherine Sandusky, Mrs. Guy Crook, Mrs. Will Crook, Miss Oddie Lapp, Mrs. Belle Mulligan, Mrs. Lottie Nichols, Mrs. L. Bonsell, Mrs. Glenn D. Martin, Mrs. Jim Birdsley, Mrs. Bryan Morris, Mrs. W. E. Schenck and Mrs. Will Holt.

Interment will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, June 16, 1936

Pionner of County Expires at Verdon

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Henry Clay Ray, 82, a long-time resident of Richardson county, died at 6 o'clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W.E. Marsh, Verdon.

Mr. Ray, who was a retired farmer, had been ill for five months. He was a widower.

Mr. Ray was born at Des Moines, Ia., January 12, 1854. He was married at Humboldt in November, 1870.

Surviving are two sons, Jess Ray, Nebraska City, and Ned Ray, Omaha; two daughters, Mrs. Sara Pullen, Torrington, Wyo., and Mrs. W.E. Marsh, Verdon; and one brother, K. C. Ray, Auburn, Wash.

The funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the Marsh home at Verdon. The Rev. A.T. Evans will conduct the services. Burial will be in the Lynchburg cemetery southeast of Humboldt.


The Falls City Journal, October 22, 1936

Lifelong Resident of Richardson Dies

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Wilson J. Goolsby, 67, life time resident of Richardson county died last night at his home near Verdon following an illness of eight days.

Mr. Goolsby was born March 1, 1869, at Barada and lived in this county all his life on a farm.  He never married.

Surviving are two brothers, W. V. Goolsby, and G. C. Goolsby of Verdon; and three sisters, Mrs. Mary Davis of Burwell, Neb., Mrs. W. R. Smith of Verdon and Mrs. Emma Simpson of Barada.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Verdon Christian church.  Burial will be in Maple Grove cemetery southeast of Verdon.


The Falls City Journal, November 27, 1936

Lifetime County Resident Expires

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William Van Buren Goolsby, 67, retired farmer of Verdon and a lifelong resident of Richardson county, died at 4:20 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at his home following a long illness.  Cancer was reported as the cause of death.  Mr. Goolsby had been in serious condition for about two weeks.

He was born March 1, 1869, in the Barada vicinity and most of his life farmed in the county.  He was married at Falls City, December 17, 1895.

His twin brother, Wilson J. Goolsby of Verdon, died October 21.  Cancer also the cause of death.

Besides his widow, he is survived by six children, Mrs. Hazel McKinsey, Verdon, Mrs. Mable Watkins, Salem, Mrs. Elmer Percival, Falls City, Wilson C. Goolsby, Verdon, and Mrs. Wilma Watkins, Verdon; one brother, George C. Goolsby, Verdon, and three sisters, Mrs. Ellen Smith, Verdon, Mrs. Mary Davis, Burwell, and Mrs. Emma Simpson, Barada.

The funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Verdon Christian church.  The Rev. A. T. Evans will conduct the services.  Burial will be in Maple Grove cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August 10, 1937

Former Citizen Dies in Denver

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John A. Crook, Founder of Monarch Engineering Company, Succumbs to Pneumonia.

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Pneumonia yesterday afternoon claimed the life of John A. Crook, 58, former Falls Cityan, founder of the Monarch Engineering Company and head of the Denver Steel and Iron works. Mr. Crook suffered a nervous breakdown four months ago and had been ill since.

John A. Crook and his brother, Guy A. Crook of Falls City, were founders of the Monarch Engineering company which had its origin and main offices at Falls City, with offices in Kansas City, and Denver. Under the management of these men the Monarch Engineering company had risen to become an important and prosperous concern and a vast amount of bridge construction, city paving, irrigation-dam building, and public building work has been done under their supervision.

Within ten years after the firm had been in operation, or since 1908, its activities constantly increased and in 1917 they purchased the Denver Steel and Iron Works in order to facilitate the material supply part of the construction work in which they were engaged.

Mr. Crook was born in Falls City, April 9, 1879, a son of the late W. H. Crook, hardware merchant. He received his education in the public and high schools of Falls City and studied in the state university. He pursued an engineering course with the International Correspondence school of Scranton, Pa., and was first employed with the Canton Bridge company of Omaha as structural and construction engineer for two years, 1898 to 1900. He returned to Falls City in 1900 and entered the employ of the John Gilligan Bridge company and remained with this concern until 1908. He then established the Monarch Engineering Company, being joined by his brother, Guy A. Crook, in 1910.

In October of 1916 the growth of the concern required that he locate in Denver where he had charge of the Denver Steel and Iron Works and looked after the company's western operations.

Mr. Crook was married in 1900 to Miss Minnie Dalbey of Coin, Ia. A son, John A., Jr., preceeded the father in death.

Besides his widow he is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Gordon Ambrose, Tacoma, Wash.; two brothers, Guy A. Crook and Wm. A. Crook, both of Falls City; and a sister, Mrs. LeMoyne Locke, Alameda, Calif.

Funeral arrangements are not known.

Guy A. Crook and Wm. A. Crook left for Denver last evening.


The Falls City Journal, August 11, 1937

Crook Funeral Rites To Be Here Friday

The body of John A. Crook of Denver will arrive here at 7:30 o'clock Friday morning from Denver and funeral services will be held at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon at the Guy A. Crook home, 2305 Towle street.


The Falls City Journal, August 12, 1937

Announce Plans for John Crook Funeral

The body of John A. Crook of Denver arrived here this morning and was taken to the home of his brother, Guy A. Crook, where the funeral services will be held at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon by Rev. Edward Hutchinson.

Pallbearers will be: Dr. C. L. Hustead, Dr. S. D. Cowan, Joseph C. Reavis, Fred Graham, Roy Heacock, Bruce Stanton, Charles Stanton, and Bert Simanton.

Honorary pallbearers will include: W. R. Holt, Dr. Wm. R. Boose, D. D. Reavis, Sr., H. M. Jenne, George S. Lyon, E. H. Towle, I. B. Whitaker, Dr. J. M. Greene and John Hutchings.]Those who came with the body were Mrs. Crook and her daughter, Mrs. Gordon Ambrose, Tacoma, Wash., Wm. A. Crook and Guy A. Crook.

Burial will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, December 21, 1939

CONDITION GRAVE

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Mrs. Betty Schoenheit, 1902 Chase street, is reported critically ill at her home. She suffered a stroke Monday which paralyzed the left side of her body.


The Falls City Journal, December 26, 1939

Mrs. Schoenheit, Pioneer in City, Taken by Death

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Name Closely Associated with History of Falls City Almost Since Founding Removed.

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Resided Here 77 Years

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At Time of Death, Mrs. Schoenheit Had Lived Here Longer than Anyone Still Alive

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Mrs. Betty Schoenheit, the last Falls Cityan to bear a name which has been closely associated with the town's history almost since its founding, died at 6:45 o'clock Sunday morning at her home, 1902 Chase street. She was 86 years old.

Her father-in-law, August Schoenheit, was a pioneer lawyer who came to Falls City soon after the town was laid out. Mrs. Schoenheit at the time of her death had lived in Falls City longer than anyone else then living.

Mrs. Schoenheit had been in poor health for months. About a week ago, she suffered a stroke which was the immediate cause of her death.

The pioneer woman came to Falls City with her father, the late Thomas Moss, and his family from Kentucky in 1882. Falls City, which had been laid out only a few years before, was inhabited by about 30 families at the time. Her father was one of the town's pioneer merchants.

Mrs. Schoenheit was born in Barren county, Kentucky, July 13, 1853. She was married to Lothair Schoenheit at Rulo November 29, 1868. Until his death in 1908, Mr. Schoenheit operated a saloon across the street, west from the court house.

Mrs. Schoenheit is survived by one sister, Mrs. Maggie Argenbright of Waterville, Kas.

The funeral services were held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the Schoenheit home with the Rev. Edward M. Hutchinson conducting the services. Burial was in Steele cemetery. Reavis & Macomber had charge of the arrangements.


The Falls City Journal, December 27, 1939

Inadvertently omitted in the mention of survivors of the late Mrs. Betty Schoenheit was a grandson, L. L. Schoenheit, who resides in Hollywood, Calif.


The Falls City Journal, October 8, 1941

Goolsby Funeral To Be Thursday

Funeral services for Alonzo E. Goolsby, 70, whose death was reported in the Falls City Journal Tuesday, will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Simpson-Dorr & Philpot's.  Rev. S. D. Olney, Lincoln, will be in charge.  Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Mr. Goolsby lived in Falls City all of his life until a few weeks ago when he moved to Horton where he died early yesterday.  He was born here July 30, 1871.  He was married to Ida Tate at St. Joseph October 25, 1925.

He was a bridge builder for the Missouri Pacific but was on the retired list at the time of his death.

Mr. Goolsby is survived by his widow; three brothers, Dave Goolsby, Auburn, Mark Goolsby, Salem, and Elvin Goolsby, Owensville, Mo., and a sister, Mrs. Grant Smith, Humboldt.


The Falls City Journal, December 9, 1941

Native of County Claimed by Death

Isaac Wesley Crook, 77, died this morning at a hospital in Lincoln where he had been confined for some time. He was born May 18, 1864, in Richardson county.

He is survived by his widow and two sons, living in Ohio, a brother, Jesse Crook, Denver, and a sister, Mrs. Belle Crook, Los Angeles.

The body was brought here overland by Reavis & Macomber's and taken to their funeral home. Funeral arrangements have not been made.


The Falls City Journal, December 10, 1941

Funeral of Crook will be Thursday

Funeral services for Isaac Wesley Crook will be held at 10 o'clock Thursday morning at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home in charge of Rev. Harold M. Bryant.

Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, January, 1942

Late Postmaster's Widow is Stricken

Mrs. William Riley Crook, 86, wife of a former postmaster here, died recently in Denver and the body is expected to arrive here at 5:10 o'clock Friday morning over the Burlington railroad. It will be take to Reavis & Macomber's funeral home.

Mrs. Crook, nee Lucinda Martin, was born April 4, 1855 in north-western Missouri. She was a daughter of the late Rev. and Mrs. Isaac Martin. Her father was a Methodist minister and for a number of years, the family lived on what now is known as the W. T. Nutter farm. Mrs. Crook spent most of her girlhood and early married life in this area.

Mr. Crook served as postmaster here for a number of years. The family left here in the late nineties, moving to Paonia, Colo. Mr. Crook died about 1920 and since Mrs. Crook has made her home in Denver.

She is survived by two sons, Zeno E. Crook, Denver, and Joe Crook, Los Angeles.

A private funeral service will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at Reavis & Macomber's and burial will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, November 11, 1946

STROKE FOR WEAVER

Paul B. Weaver, 67, prominent landowner and former chairman of the board of Richardson county commissioners, suffered a stroke Sunday morning at his home here and is believed to be in a serious condition. The stroke affected his speech and his right side. Mr. Weaver apparently had been in good health up to the time of the stroke. His son-in-law and daughter, Dr. and Mrs. William Glenn, Rochester, Minn., are expected to arrive today to be at his bedside.


The Falls City Journal, November 13, 1946

The condition of Paul B. Weaver who suffered a stroke Sunday is believed slightly improved today.


The Falls City Journal, November 14, 1946

The condition of Paul B. Weaver who suffered a stroke Sunday, was reported somewhat improved today. Mr. Weaver has recovered consciousness.


The Falls City Journal, November 16, 1946

Paul B. Weaver Dies of Stroke at Home Here

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67-year-old Former Chairman of Board of County Commissioners

Native of City.

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Pioneer Apple Grower

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Brother of Ex-governor One of First in County to Vaccinate Hogs against Cholera.

Paul B. Weaver, 67, prominent landowner and farmer, former chairman of the county board, died at his home here shortly before midnight from complications following an apoplectic stroke last Sunday.

Although Mr. Weaver’s speech had not returned, he appeared to have regained consciousness and his condition appeared somewhat improved through the days following the stroke until last night when it took a sudden turn for the worse.

Mr. Weaver served as chairman of the board of county commissioners during the construction of the new Richardson county court house (the present building) in 1923 and 1924 and his close supervision of the construction was credited in saving the county considerable money.

Mr. Weaver served on the board of commissioners from January, 1923, to January, 1927.

He was one of the landowners who pioneered Drainage District No. 1, which straightened the Nemaha from Dawson to the mouth and reclaimed thousands of acres of bottom lands for farming. Mr. Weaver went on the board of directors of the district and remained until he was elected county commissioner. In the years since, he again served on the drainage board at different times and always was active in its affairs.

Mr. Weaver, with his brother, the late Arthur J. Weaver, pioneered the commercial apple industry in the county. He got out of the apple business in 1920, transferring his interests in orcharding to his brother at that time.

A progressive farm operator, Mr. Weaver was credited with being one of the first in the county to adopt the practice of vaccinating hogs against cholera.

Mr. Weaver was a native of Falls City, being born here Nov. 19, 1878. He grew up, attended the Falls City schools and upon completing high school here, he entered Nebraska university where he was graduated in law in 1902.

Immediately after graduation, he located at Cordell, Okla., where he practiced law from 1902 to 1905. He returned to Falls City and practiced law here for several years. He gradually turned his major interests to horticulture and farming and gave up his law practice.

He was the son of pioneer parents, Mr. and Mrs. Archibald J. Weaver. His father was an early day district judge here and later represented this district in congress. Mr. Weaver was married Aug. 30, 1900, to Miss Anna L. Crook of Falls City, also a member of a pioneer family.

Mr. Weaver is survived by his widow; three sons, Bennett Weaver, at home, Archibald J. Weaver, Falls City, and Lawrence M. Weaver, Salem; four daughters, Miss Martha Weaver, Lincoln, Mrs. Lloyd Neil, Lexington, Neb., Mrs. H. H. Welch, Falls City, and Mrs. William V. Glenn, Rochester, Minn.; one brother, Lawrence M. Weaver, Spokane, Wash., and one sister, Mrs. Ruth W. Dennis, Altadena, Calif. Twelve grandchildren also survive him.

The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at the Weaver home where Mr. Weaver’s body now lies. The services will be at 2:30 o’clock in the afternoon with the Rev. Richard Carlyon in charge. Burial will be in Steele cemetery. Reavis & Macomber’s have charge of the arrangements.

The pallbearers will be Wm. Uhlig, Charles Kentopp, Steve Miles, E. H. Towle, Ray Smith and M. D. Glenn.


The Falls City Journal, November 22, 1947

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Crook returned this morning from Aberdeen, Ida., where they have spent seven months.


The Falls City Journal, December 1, 1947

W. A. Crook, 2301 Crook street, entered Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital Saturday for treatment.


The Falls City Journal, December 12, 1947

William A. Crook Passes at Age 65

William A. Crook, 65, prominent Falls City hardware merchant, died at 11:30 o'clock this morning at Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital after a long illness.

Heart disease and complications caused the death. A kidney ailment developed recently and probably was the immediate cause of death. Mr. Crook had been in the hospital for about two weeks.


The Falls City Journal, December 13, 1947

Rites on Tuesday For William Crook

Funeral services for William Allen Crook, 65, Falls City hardware merchant, who died Friday will be held at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the family home at 2304 Crook Street. Rev. Gerald Claudius of St. Thomas' Episcopal church will conduct the service. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Pallbearers will be Tom Poteet, Harold Weinert, Carl C. Weinert, James Thompson, Dowell Whitaker and Jess Ramsey.

Honorary Pallbearers will be Clarence Simon, Frank Schaible, Dr. S. D. Cowan, Harry M. Jenne, W. R. Holt, Guy Hutchins, Chas. Stanton, E. H. Towle, James M. Ramsey, Ed Coatney, I. B. Whitaker, Steve B. Miles and Fred Graham.

The body of Mr. Crook is at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home where it will remain until 9 o'clock Monday morning when it will be taken to the family residence.

Mr. Crook was born Feb. 9, 1882, in Falls City, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crook. His father was also a well-known hardware merchant here for years. W. A. Crook's grandfather was Jesse Crook, who with his wife, became the third permanent settlers in Richardson county. They came to this area in 1855. they settled on a farm at a point a mile from where Falls City sprang up.

W. A. Crook was graduated from Falls City high school in 1900 and became associated with his father in the hardware business at the present location of the Crook hardware store. He had since been a hardware merchant with the exception of two years when he was associated with his brothers, John A. Crook and Guy A. Crook, in the contracting business in Colorado.

Dec. 24, 1903, Mr. Crook was married to Miss Marion Kachelries. One son born to this union died in infancy.

Mr. Crook is a past president of the local Rotary club.

Besides his widow, Mr. Crook is survived by a sister, Mrs. Jane Locke, Hutchinson, Kas.; a brother, Guy A. Crook, Falls City, and five nephews.


The Falls City Journal, December 15, 1947

Requiem Mass for W. A. Crook Tuesday

A requiem mass for the late W. A. Crook will be held tomorrow at 7:15 a. m. at St. Thomas' Episcopal church by the Rev. G. L. Claudius. Mr. Crook, who died here Friday, was senior warden of St. Thomas'.


The Falls City Journal, July 13, 1949

Mrs. Tom Whitaker, 711 East 14th street, entered Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital Tuesday for medical treatment.


The Falls City Journal, July 25, 1949

Mrs. T. J. Whitaker Dies Here at 72

Mrs. Thomas J. Whitaker, 72, a lifetime resident of Falls City, died this morning at Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital where she had been a patient the past two weeks. Mrs. Whitaker had been ill from a heart ailment for some time.

Born in Falls City Jan. 6, 1877, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Smith, Mrs. Whitaker was a member of the First Christian church and the Eastern Star and Rebekah lodges. She was active for many years in church activities.

Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker were married here July 1, 1900.

Surviving are her husband; one son, John Whitaker, Norman, Okla., a member of the faculty of the University of Oklahoma; a sister, Mrs. May Maxwell, Tacoma, Wash., and one grandchild.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2:30 o'clock at the Reavis and Macomber funeral home with the Rev. H. E. Cunningham in charge. Burial will be in Steele cemetery. The body will remain at the funeral home until time for the services.


The Falls City Journal, July 26, 1949

Pallbearers Chosen for Mrs. Whitaker

Pallbearers have been chosen for the funeral of Mrs. T. J. Whitaker which will be held at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home.

They will include: Wm. Uhlig, Harry Pence, H. E. Thompson, Archibald Weaver, Wm. Boose and M. C. Bullock.

Flower bearers will be: Mrs. E. B. Schoenfield, Mrs. W. R. Boose, Mrs. H. A. Jefferies, Mrs. Ed Fisher, Mrs. Norman Marmet and Mrs. Arlin Fritz.


The Falls City Journal, November 13, 1951

Mrs. Eliza Goolsby Passes Away Here

Mrs. Eliza Ellen Goolsby, 87, a lifetime resident of Richardson county, died at 6:15 o'clock this morning at her home here at 1704 Morton street.  Mrs. Goolsby became seriously ill last Thursday with a heart condition and complications.

Mrs. Goolsby was born May 9, 1864, near Verdon.  She was a daughter of the late David and Rose Allison.  Mar. 5, 1889, she was united in marriage at Verdon to Grant Goolsby.  The couple established their home four miles east of Verdon where Mrs. Goolsby continued to live until 1935 when she moved into Falls City.  Mr. Goolsby died Nov. 18, 1923.

Mrs. Goolsby was a member of the Methodist church and of the Rebekah lodge.

Mrs. Goolsby is survived by three daughters, Miss Alice Goolsby, of the home, Mrs. A. Robertson, Falls City, and Mrs. B. F. Randall, Route 1, Verdon,  and two sons, Jess J. Goolsby and George A. Goolsby, both of Falls City.  There are nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

The body of Mrs. Goolsby is at the Reavis & Macomber funeral home where funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon in charge of Rev. Harold M. Bryant.  Burial will be in the Maple Grove cemetery northwest of Falls City.


The Falls City Journal, February 13, 1952

Heart Attack Fatal To Mrs. Locke, 52

A native of Falls City, Mrs. Eliza Jane Locke, 52 died of an acute heart attack Sunday, Feb. 10, 1952, at Hutchinson, Kas.

Mrs. Locke was born July 24, 1899, in Fall City. She was a daughter of the late Wm. H. and Lydia Crook.

Mrs. Locke is survived by two sons, Donald McLeod, San Francisco, and James Locke, address unknown, and a brother, Guy A. Crook, Falls City.

The body of Mrs. Locke was brought here overland by Reavis & Macomber's funeral home and at 2 o'clock this afternoon was taken to Steele cemetery where a private graveside service was held in charge of Rec. John S. W. Fargher. Burial was in the family plot there.

Mr. McLeod arrived here this morning to attend the funeral of his mother.


The Falls City Journal, June 11, 1953

Asa R. Crook, 71, Dies in Colorado

A native of this area, Asa Roscoe Crook, 71, was found dead in bed this morning, June 11, at his home at Ft. Collins, Colo., according to word received here by relatives.

Mr. Crook had spent most of the last two or three years in the Veterans hospital at Cheyenne, Wyo.

Mr. Crook was born Mar. 3, 1882, near Falls City. He was a son of the late G. J. Crook and Mary Macomber Crook. He was the first of their children to succumb. He attended Falls City high school.

Mr. Crook was appointed deputy clerk of the district court of Richardson county for a time and was also deputy postmaster under his father.

He left this area because of his health in 1905 or 1906, going to Grand Junction, Colo. He served as an instructor in the Industrial School for Boys in Boulder, Colo., in 1915. He worked one summer on a construction crew on the Seward to Fairbanks, Alaska, railroad.

Mr. Crook enlisted in World War I but saw no combat. He was invalided home from camp.

Sept. 8, 1926, Mr. Crook was married at Ft. Collins, Colo.

Besides his widow, Mr. Crook is survived by three step-sons; three brothers, Miles Crook, Falls City, John Crook, Houston, Tex., and E. J. Crook, Orland, Calif., and a sister, Mrs. Paul B. Weaver, Falls City.

The body of Mr. Crook will be set here for burial. Definite arrangements are not known here yet.


The Falls City Journal, June 15, 1953

Crook Services to Be Held Tuesday

The body of Asa R. Crook, 71, who died Thursday, June 11, at Ft. Collins, Colo., will arrive in Falls City Tuesday afternoon on the Burlington and taken to the Reavis and Macomber funeral home.

Prayer services will be held at the funeral home at 4 p. m. Tuesday conducted by the Rev. John Stayton. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Pallbearers will be Archibald J. Weaver, Archibald J. Weaver, Jr., Lawrence M. Weaver, Lawrence M. Weaver, Jr., Hal Welch and Claire M. Foster.


The Falls City Journal, March 5, 1954

Heart Attack Fatal To Mark A. Goolsby

The victim of a heart attack, Mark A. Goolsby, 74, Verdon, died at 6:45 o'clock Thursday evening, Mar. 3, at his home.  He suffered the heart attack just shortly before his death.  Mr. Goolsby had been in failing health for seven years.

Mr. Goolsby was born Dec. 4, 1879, at Falls City.  He was a lifetime resident of Richardson county with the exception of a period of five years from 1911 to 1916 spent near Gordon, Neb.

Apr. 8, 1908, he was married to Ruth Finley.  The couple lived on a farm 3 miles southwest of Verdon until 1951 when they retired and moved into Verdon.

Besides his widow, Mr. Goolsby is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Rueben Joy, Falls City; two sons, Lawrence Goolsby, Concordia, Kas., and Gordon Goolsby, Verdon, and a sister, Mrs. Bertie Smith, Falls City.  There are three grandchildren.

The body of Mr. Goolsby is here at the Dorr-Philpot funeral home where funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon in charge of Rev. J. C. Miller.  Burial will be in the Verdon cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, April 15, 1954

I. B. Whitaker, 87, Falls City, underwent major surgery Wednesday at the Seton hospital in Austin, Tex., according to word received here by his son-in-law, Henry F. Schepman, from Mrs. Schepman, who is at her father's bedside. Mr. Whitaker stood the operation satisfactorily. Mr. Whitaker underwent a left lumbar sympathectomy in which the nerves on the left side of his back bone, which cause pain that goes to the leg, were severed. Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker have been spending the winter at Austin with their daughter, Mrs. Gale Linsley and Mr. Linsley.


The Falls City Journal, August 5, 1954

I. B. Whitaker, 87, Passes Away Here

I. B. "Bert" Whitaker, 87, longtime and prominent Falls City businessman, died shortly before noon today at the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Schepman, at 2302 Chase street.

Mr. Whitaker had been in failing health for several months following the amputation of a leg at Austin, Tex. His condition had gradually become worse since returning to Falls City a month ago and had been critical the past several weeks.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

The body of Mr. Whitaker is at the Reavis & Macomber funeral home.


The Falls City Journal, August 6, 1954

Whitaker Rites Will Be Sunday

Funeral services for Isaac Burton Whitaker, 87, who died yesterday, Aug. 5, at 11:20 a. m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Henry F. Schepman, will be held Sunday at 2:30 p. m. at the First Christian church with the Rev. H. Kochheim officiating.

Active pallbearers will be M. C. Bullock, Bryan Morris, Loy Franklin, Vert Sailors, Robert Vogele and Earl Andrews. Honorary pallbearers will be E. H. Towle, D. D. Reavis, Sr., William Uhlig, Fred H. Schock, Ralph H. Jenne, Virgil Falloon, Ed Coatney, George Prater, Elza Shaw, William Tiehen, Fred Hillyard, Guy A. Crook and N. W. Todd.

The body of Mr. Whitaker is at the Reavis & Macomber funeral home and from 1:30 p. m. Sunday will lie in state at the church until the funeral hour. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Mr. Whitaker's illness was due to a circulatory condition from which he had suffered since February, 1953. Two operations were performed. The first was a nerve operation and later surgery was performed for the amputation of the left leg. Both operations were performed in Austin, Tex., where Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker were visiting their daughter, Mrs. Gale Linsley, and Mr. Linsley. Prior to going to Austin, Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker had visited their son, Harvey Whitaker, and family at San Antonio, Tex.

Mr. Whitaker was born near Cookeville, Tenn., Aug. 15, 1866, and came to Falls City with his parents and eight brothers and sisters in 1884. With the exception of two years spent on a homestead in western Kansas he had been a continuous resident of this community for 70 years.

As a young man, he engaged in farming and later took a position with the W. H. Crook Hardware store here . Some time afterwards he entered into a loan business with E. H. Towle, and after several years, Mr. Towle, in 1900, sold his interest to the late James Whitaker, a brother of Bert Whitaker, and thus was formed the firm of Whitaker Bros., real estate, loans and insurance. After the death of James Whitaker, another brother, H. D. Whitaker, entered the firm, which still continues in business.

Bert Whitaker served as a city councilman and was vitally interested in Falls City, contributing much through the years to civic improvement. He was an active and devout member of the First Christian church, serving for many years as a member of the church board and as a deacon and elder. Mr. Whitaker was highly respected by his many friends and one long-time friend and business associate recently paid him the tribute of saying of Mr. Whitaker: "He was the most honorable man I have ever known and a devoted husband and father."

Mr. Whitaker is survived by his wife, Victoria Harvey Whitaker, San Antonio, Tex., two daughters, Mrs. Gale C. Linsley, Austin, Tex., and Mrs. Henry F. Schepman, Falls City; three grandchildren; three brothers, J. G. Whitaker, Thomas J. Whitaker and H. D. Whitaker, and three sisters, Mrs. Sally Wyatt, Mrs. Lou Barrett, and Mrs. Bess Schoenheit Reed, all of Falls City. He was preceded in death by a son, Stanley James Whitaker, who died at the age of two in 1910.


The Falls City Journal, December 20, 1954

Guy A. Crook, 2305 Towle street is reported critically ill at Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital


The Falls City Journal, January 4, 1955

Guy A. Crook Passes Away

Guy A. Crook, 69, owner of the Monarch Engineering company, died at 8:20 o'clock this morning, Jan. 4, 1955, at Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital. Mr. Crook had been in failing health for three years. Three weeks ago he suffered a stroke and since had been confined to Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital.

Mr. Crook was born June 9, 1885, in Falls City, and was a lifetime resident here. He was a son of the late W. H. and Lydia Crook. His father was a former representative from this district in the Nebraska legislature and for years was a leading hardware merchant in Falls City.

Mr. Crook received his schooling in the local public schools and was graduated from Falls City high school. In 1908 he was graduated from the University of Nebraska engineering college as a civil engineer.

Following his graduation, Mr. Crook was engaged in the automobile business here at 17th and Harlan streets for a time before becoming a partner with his brother, John A. Crook, in the Monarch Engineering Company and latter the Denver Steel and Iron Works of Denver. Following the death of his brother, John A. Crook, in 1937, Mr. Crook became sole owner of the Monarch Engineering company.

Mr. Crook was a member of the Presbyterian church here; the Nebraska chapter, Associated General Contractors; the Falls City Lions Club, in which he was recently awarded a 15 year membership pin. He held a life membership in the Falls City Elks lodge, was a member of the Falls City Masonic lodge, a life member of the Lincoln Shrine and a member of the Southeast Nebraska Shrine club.

Mr. Crook served on the Falls City school board for several years.

Apr. 18, 1911, he was united in marriage to Miss Florence Harman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Harman at Tecumseh.

Besides his widow, Mr. Crook is survived by two sons, Dr. Guy H. Crook and William H. Crook, both of Falls City. There are seven grandchildren.

The body of Mr. Crook is here at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home.

Funeral services for Mr. Crook will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the family home at 2305 Towle street in charge of Rev. H. Kochheim. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, January 5, 1955

Complete Plans for Guy A. Crook Rites

William Boose, Edwin Towle, Charles Uhlig, Jack Mitchell, Jess Ramsey and Albert Maust will serve as pallbearers for the funeral of Guy A. Crook to be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the family home at 2305 Towle street. Rev. H. Kochheim will conduct the service. Mr. Crook died Tuesday.

Honorary pallbearers will include: Frank Schaible, E. H. Towle, William Uhlig, John Falter, Fred Graham, Steve Miles, Guy Hutchins, Dr. S. D. Cowan, H. D. Whitaker, Dr. C. L. Hustead, Virgil Falloon, Charles Stanton and Frank Hebenstreit.

The body of Mr. Crook is at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home here and at 11 o'clock Thursday morning will be taken to the family residence.

The Masonic lodge will have charge of graveside services in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, May 5, 1955

J. G. "Gid" Whitaker, veteran auctioneer, is quite ill at his home here with a heart ailment. Mr. Whitaker is 91 years old.


The Falls City Journal, June 25, 1955

'Gid' Whitaker Dies at Hospital

John Gideon "Gid" Whitaker, 91, died at 3:10 o'clock Friday afternoon, June 24, 1955, at Our Lady of Perpetual Help hospital. Death was caused by a heart condition and complications. Mr. Whitaker entered the hospital June 12.

Mr. Whitaker was born Jan. 5, 1864, at Cooksville, Tenn. When he was a boy he moved to Independence, Kas., with his parents and later went to Kansas City. He came to Falls City in 1908 and had since lived here.

Mr. Whitaker was a retired farmer and auctioneer. He was civic minded and took an active part in local activities. In the spring of 1888, Mr. Whitaker was united in marriage to Miss Martha E. Nutter, daughter of William and Aramatha Nutter, at Reserve, Kas. Mrs. Whitaker died Dec. 31, 1935.

Mr. Whitaker is survived by two sons, Charles Whitaker of Falls City and Fred Whitaker of Fort Collins, Colo.; two brothers, Thomas J. Whitaker and H. D. Whitaker, both of Falls City; and three sisters, Mrs. Henry Wyatt, Mrs. Samuel Reed and Mrs. Lou Barrett, all of Falls City. There are two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

The body of Mr. Whitaker is here at Reavis & Macomber's funeral home where the funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon in charge of Rev. H. E. Cunningham. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Pallbearers will be: Gus Scholz, Edgar Roesch, Bryan Morris, Paul D. Zimmer, Glenn Martin and Ed Kentopp.

Honorary pallbearers will include: E. H. Towle, William Uhlig, Leo Nusbaum, George Prater, D. D. Reavis, Sr., George Lyon, Fred Hillyard, E. E. Coatney and Warren Parker, all of Falls City, and Henry Herold, Salem.


The Falls City Journal, October 15, 1957

Mrs. Whitaker, 83, Expires at Hospital

Mrs. I. B. Whitaker, 83, died at 2:10 o'clock this afternoon, Oct. 15, 1957, at Community hospital. She had been in the hospital for treatment for a circulatory ailment.

Details of the funeral arrangements will be announced later.


The Falls City Journal, October 15, 1957

Gale C. Linsley of San Antonio, Tex., is expected to arrive here this afternoon to be with his wife, who has been at the bedside of her mother, Mrs. I. B. Whitaker, who passed away today.


The Falls City Journal, October 16, 1957

Whitaker Services Being Held Friday

Funeral Services for Mrs. I. B. Whitaker, 83, who died Tuesday afternoon, will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at the First Christian church here in charge of Rev. Albert B. Gray, assisted by Rev. H. E. Cunningham. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Mrs. Whitaker, nee Victoria Harvey, was a daughter of the late S. H. and Sarah Ann Harvey. She was born May 14, 1874, in Knightstown, Ind., and came to Falls City as a small child with her parents in 1882, and had since lived here. the last few years she had been making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Henry F. Schepman, and Mr. Schepman.

Dec. 7, 1899, she was united in marriage to Isaac Burton Whitaker in Falls City. Mr. Whitaker died Aug. 5, 1954. She was also preceded in death by a son, James Stanley Whitaker, in 1910, at the age of two years.

Mrs. Whitaker is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Henry F. Schepman, Falls City, and Mrs. Gale C. Linsley, San Antonio, Tex., and a son, Harvey Burton Whitaker, San Antonio. There also are three grandchildren.

The body of Mrs. Whitaker is here at the Reavis-Macomber and Dorr-Philpot funeral home. It will lie in state from 10 o'clock Friday morning at the First Christian church until the funeral hour.

Mrs. Whitaker was a member of the First Christian church and was very active in church work until recent years. She also was an active member of the Falls City Woman's club, the Richardson County Historical society and a member of the Friendship class and Edna circle of the Methodist church.


The Falls City Journal, October 17, 1957

Complete Plans Whitaker Funeral

Pallbearers have been chosen for the funeral of Mrs. Bert Whitaker to be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at the First Christian church here. Mrs. Whitaker died Tuesday.

Active pallbearers will be: Robert Peck, Leo Burgett, Loy Franklin, Hal Garvey, M. C. Bullock and A. E. Elam.

Honorary pallbearers will include: E. H. Towle, D. D. Reavis, Sr., Frank Schaible and Virgil Falloon.

Rev. Albert B. Gray, assisted by Rev. H. E. Cunningham, will conduct the service. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

The body of Mrs. Whitaker is here at the Reavis-Macomber and Dorr-Philpot funeral home and from 10 o'clock Friday morning will lie in state at the church until the funeral hour.


The Falls City Journal, October 17, 1957

Harvey B. Whitaker and Gail C. Linsley went to Kansas City today to meet Mr. Whitaker's wife, who arrived there this morning from San Antonio, Tex., on her way to attend the funeral of her husbands mother, Mrs. I. B. Whitaker, on Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Whitaker also arrived from Ft. Collins, Colo., today.


The Falls City Journal, April, 1958

Mrs. Miles Crook, 77, Dies on Birthday

Mrs. Miles Crook, 77, 1116 Wilson street, died at 2 o'clock Sunday morning, Mar. 30, 1958, at Community hospital. She passed away on her birthday.

Mrs. Crook, nee Louise Deuchler, was born Mar. 30, 1881, in Baden, Germany. She came to Richardson county with her parents, the late Englehardt and Catherine Deuchler, in 1884 and had since lived here.

She was married to William Jenkins and he died. Several years following his death she was married the second time to Miles Crook, Sept. 1, 1942, at Hamburg, Ia.

Mrs. Crook was a member of the Evangelical United Brethren church.

Besides her husband, Mrs. Crook has no immediate survivors other than several nieces and nephews.

The body of Mrs. Crook is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home and at 1 o'clock Tuesday will be taken to the church to lie in state until 2 o'clock, the funeral hour. Rev. John E. Biegert will conduct the service. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Pallbearers will be: Archibald Weaver, Charles Bolay, Fred Fetzner, William Zoeller, Floyd Solt and Earl Solt.

Out-of-town relatives here Tuesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Miles Crook were: Mrs. Lee Embrey, St. Joseph; Mrs. and Mrs. Fredrick Luehrman, Lexington, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Les Burrows, Independence Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Kubel, Mrs. Elmer Castan and Miss Louise Kubel, all of Nebraska City.


The Falls City Journal, November 28, 1958

Mrs. Mattie Goolsby Dies at Age of 83

Mrs. Mattie Goolsby, 83, Verdon, died at 9:15 o'clock this morning, Nov. 28, 1958, at the Holman hospital in Humboldt.  She had been in failing health for four years and had been a resident of the Holman hospital for three years.  She had been seriously ill with pneumonia for a week.

Mrs. Goolsby was born Sept. 22, 1875, at Lennox, Ia.  She went with her parents, the late John and Susan Holt to Holt county, Missouri, as a child and after a few years they came to Richardson county and settled in the Verdon area where she had since made her home.

Mrs. Goolsby joined the Methodist church in Missouri and had been active in the Verdon Christian church since coming to this county.

Mrs. Goolsby is survived by five daughters, Mrs. G. W. McKinsey, Verdon, Mrs. Ernest Watkins, Omaha, Mrs. Elmer Percival, Scottsbluff, Mrs. Edmund Bauer, Falls City, and Mrs. Harold Watkins, Shenandoah, Ia., and a son, William C. Goolsby, Auburn.  There are 13 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

The body of Mrs. Goolsby is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home.


The Falls City Journal, July, 1959

Miles A. Crook, 73, Passes Away Here

Miles A. Crook, 73, 1116 Wilson street, a retired rural mail carrier, died at 9:25 p. m. Saturday, July 4, 1959, at the Sailors nursing home here. Mr. Crook had been in failing health for six months. He entered the nursing home on June 6 because of his health.

Mr. Crook was born Nov. 15, 1885, southeast of Falls City, a son of Glenwin J. and Mary Catherine Crook. As a young man he was active in church and lodge work and was also a member of the Falls City Volunteer Fire department for a number of years. He became an employee of the U.S. postal department as a young man and was retired as a rural mail carrier in 1948.

Mr. Crook was a member if the First Methodist church and the Nemaha Valley lodge No. 36, I.O.O.F.

Sept. 1, 1942, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Louise Jenkins at Hamburg, Ia. She preceded him in death Mar. 30, 1958.

Mr. Crook is survived by a sister, Mrs. P. B. Weaver, Falls City, and a brother, E. J. Crook, Orland, Calif., and several nieces and nephews.

The body of Mr. Crook is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home where funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in charge of Rev. Albert B. Gray. Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.

Pallbearers will be: Robert Casey, Fred Meinzer, R. D. Slagle, Ralph Steinbrink, Lanthan Camblin and Dale Purvis.


The Falls City Journal, June 28, 1960

Mrs. Ruth Goolsby Dies at Age of 80

Mrs. Ruth Finley Goolsby, 80, Verdon, passed away at 2:55 a. m. today, June 28, 1960, at the Sailors nursing home.  She had been in failing health for five years, having been hospitalized at Community hospital the last two weeks in May.  Since then she had resided at the nursing home.

Born Apr. 22, 1880, at Woodruff, Kas., Mrs. Goolsby came to Falls City at the age of 13 with her parents, the late Frank and Mary Catherine Finley.  She had lived in Richardson county most of her life.

She was united in marriage to Mark A. Goolsby Apr. 8, 1908, at Falls City.  She was proceeded in death by her husband, who died Mar. 23, 1954.

Mrs. Goolsby joined the Methodist church in Falls City in 1908 and was a charter member of the Woodman circle.

Surviving are two sons, Lawrence and Gordon, both of Verdon, and a daughter, Mrs. Rueben Joy, Falls City; a sister, Mrs. Bertha Putnam, and a brother, John Finley, both of Falls City.  there are three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

The body of Mrs. Goolsby is at Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home where funeral services will be held in the chapel at 2 p. m. on Friday.  Rev. Ward Merritt, Humboldt, will officiate and burial will be in the Verdon cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, March, 1960

Donald Weaver Killed In Omaha Auto Crash

County Youth Driving Car Ramming Truck at City’s Outskirts.

Donald G. Weaver, 21, Omaha, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence M. Weaver, Sr., Salem, was killed instantly Friday afternoon, Mar. 25, 1960, when the car he was driving collided with a semi-trailer truck at the intersection of 132nd and Dodge streets, west of Omaha.

Also killed in the accident was Rollin C. Williams, 23, Omaha, who was riding with Weaver.

United Press International reported that witnesses said the Weaver car went through a Stop sigh at high

speed, onto busy Dodge highway. It smashed into the west-bound semi-trailer truck, hitting the truck in the middle of the trailer.

State Safety Patrol Capt. Don Shearer said only a spare tire mount under the trailer kept the car from shooting straight through, underneath the tank.

The truck, owned by the Warren Oil Co., Omaha, was driven by Raymond Clary, 33, Omaha, who escaped serious injury. The vehicle rolled 100 feet down the highway after the crash before running into the north ditch.

Clary said he saw the north-bound Weaver car coming, but that he could do nothing to get his slow-moving truck out of the intersection as the car hurtled into it.

Donald was born June 29, 1938, at Salem. He attended District 45 and Verdon school, where he was a fine athlete. He was graduated from Verdon high school in 1956 and then attended the Commercial Extension business school in Omaha. He had been employed by the Western Electric company in Omaha since December of 1958.

Besides his parents, Donald is survived by two brothers, Lawrence M. Weaver, Jr., Verdon, and Paul B. Weaver, Falls City, and Mrs. Elda Wurzbacher, Oscaloosa, Ia.

His body is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o’clock Monday afternoon at the Congregational church at Verdon. Burial will be in Steele cemetery at Falls City. The body will lie in state at the church from 1:30 o’clock Monday until the funeral hour.


The Falls City Journal, March 28, 1960

Weaver Funeral Held At Verdon Today

Pallbearers for the funeral of Donald Weaver, which was held at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon at the Verdon Congregational church were:

Walter Harring and Bill Hersh, Falls City, Eugene Fritz and Ronald and Arthur Fritz, all of Verdon, and Richard Goolsby, Omaha.

Arrangements were in charge of Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home.


The Falls City Journal, July 9, 1963

Mrs. Anna C. Weaver Dies at Age 85

Mrs. Anna C. Weaver, 85, 1910 Harlan street, died at 9:45 p.m. Monday, July 8, 1963, at Community hospital. Her death followed an extended illness. She had been bedfast for six months and had been hospitalized since June 26.

Mrs. Weaver was the widow of the late Paul B. Weaver, a former Richardson county commissioner and a local attorney.

Mrs. Weaver was a daughter of the late Glenwin J. and Mary C. Crook. She was born Feb. 6, 1878, north of what is now known as the Middleburg community, southwest of Dawson. As a baby she moved to the Falls City vicinity with her family, and in 1898 they moved into Falls City when her father was elected to serve as clerk of the district court.

Mrs. Weaver was graduated from Falls City high school in 1897 and then attended the University of Nebraska. She taught school for a year at Dist. 55, southeast of Falls City, and also in the public schools of Falls City for a year prior to her marriage.

Aug. 30, 1900, she was united in marriage to Paul B. Weaver. The couple established their home in Lincoln and lived there while Mr. Weaver attended law school. They later moved to Cordell, Okla., where they lived until returning to Falls City in 1905, where Mrs. Weaver has since resided. Mr. Weaver died Nov. 15, 1946.

Mrs. Weaver was a lifelong member of the First Methodist church of Falls City. She was also a member of the Falls City Woman’s Club.

Mrs. Weaver is survived by three sons, Bennett Weaver of the home, Archibald J. Weaver and Lawrence M. Weaver, both of Falls City; four daughters, Mrs. Martha C. Weaver, Lincoln, Mrs. Lloyd (Mary Ann) Neil, Lexington, Mrs. Hal H. (Christobel) Welch, Grand Island, and Mrs. William V. (Doris) Glenn, Falls City. She is also survived by 17 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. She was the last of a family of five children. She was preceded in death by four brothers.

The body of Mrs. Weaver is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home.


The Falls City Journal, July, 1963

Select Pallbearers For Weaver Funeral

Funeral services for Mrs. Anna C. Weaver, who died Monday evening, will be held at 10:30 o’clock Thursday morning at the First Methodist church here. The Rev. Robert Embree will conduct the service. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

Pallbearers will be: H. Keith Crook and Earl L. Crook, both of Rising City; Leo Crook, and Fred Thompson, both of Salem; Glenwin Crook, Humboldt, and Kenneth Wittwer, Sabetha.

The body of Mrs. Weaver is here at the family home at 1910 Harlan street and from 9:30 Thursday morning will lie in state at the Methodist church until the funeral hour.

Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home is in charge of the arrangements.


The Falls City Journal, June 4, 1964

Thomas Whitaker Dies at Age of 94

Former Operator of F. C. Milling Co. Suffered Stroke Wednesday.

Thomas J. Whitaker, 94, a former operator of the Falls City Milling company, died at 1:45 o'clock this morning, June 4, 1964, at Community hospital. Mr. Whitaker suffered a stroke about 9:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home at 711 East 14th street and after that was taken to the hospital.

Mr. Whitaker, the late E. H. Towle and Dr. W. R. Boose purchased the Falls City Milling company in 1925, which Mr. Whitaker managed until it was sold in 1945. Since then he has looked after his personal property and interests.

He served on the school boards here in 1908. He was a member of the First Christian church and served on the church board for many years.

He came to Falls City at the age of 14 with his parents, the late John Hickman Whitaker and Amanda Welch Whitaker. He was graduated from Falls City schools and from the Falls City Business college. He took a course in telegraphy in St. Louis and worked for the Missouri Pacific railroad at Eagle for a short time. He then became associated with the Beatrice Creamery company and established separating stations at many points in Nebraska and Colorado.

Later he was associated with Swift and Company, working out of Omaha and Dubuque, Ia. He returned to Falls City in 1900 and became associated with his father-in-law, John R. Smith, in the Falls City Exchange mill and in the feeding of cattle. He later purchased the farm and cattle feeding operations. He erected a building for a grocery, flour and feed store on East 15th street, which he and his wife operated for a few years.

Mr. Whitaker was born Apr. 1, 1870, at Cookville, Tenn. He was one of 11 children. He was married to Miss Ina D. Smith July 31, 1900, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Smith. This has been the Whitaker family home. Mrs. Whitaker died July 25, 1949.

Mr. Whitaker is survived by a son, Dr. John R. Whitaker, an instructor in journalism at the University of Oklahoma at Norman; a sister, Mrs. Bess Reed, Falls City; a grandson, Richard L. Whitaker, San Francisco, Calif., and two great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

The body of Mr. Whitaker is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home, where funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon conducted by the Rev. Donald Hood. Interment will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, June 5, 1964

Choose Pallbearers for Whitaker Rites

Pallbearers have been chosen for the funeral of Thomas J. Whitaker to be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home. Mr. Whitaker died Thursday morning.

Pallbearers will be: W. R. Boose, Jr., Walter Huettner, H. E. Thompson, Loy Franklin, Ralph Steinbrink and Jack C. Mitchell.

Interment will be in Steele cemetery. Falls City lodge No. 9 A. F. and A. M. will be in charge of Masonic services at the grave.

The Rev. Donald Hood will conduct the service.


The Falls City Journal, August, 1965

Mrs. Marion Crook Dies at Plattsmouth

Mrs. Marion Crook, 82, the widow of the late William A. Crook, a local hardware merchant here for many years, died suddenly Monday evening, Aug. 2, 1965, at the Masonic home in Plattsmouth.

Mrs. Crook had been living at the home for several months, going there from Fairmont, W. Va., where she had made her home with a niece, Mrs. E. G. Shahady, for several years. She had been in failing health for a number of years.

Mrs. Crook was born Sept. 18, 1882, at Shamokin, Pa., and came to Falls City with her parents, the late Andrew and Martha Kachelries. Dec. 24, 1903, she was married to Mr. Crook. He died Dec. 12, 1947.

Mrs. Crook was a member of St. Thomas' Episcopal church here.

Mrs. Crook is survived by a sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Blum, Fairmont, several nieces and nephews. The niece, Mrs. E. G. Shahady, is expected to arrive here Wednesday to attend the funeral of her aunt. Dr. G. H. Crook of Kennewick, Wash., a former Falls Cityan, was her nephew. She was preceded in death by a son in infancy.

The body of Mrs. Crook is being brought here overland today by the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home to their funeral home.

Funeral services for Mrs. Crook will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at St. Thomas' Episcopal church, conducted by the Rev. Charles Frandsen. Interment will be in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August, 1965

Crook Funeral to Be At Episcopal Church

Albert Maust, William R. Boose, W. B. Wanner, Erwin Harkendorff, Archibald J. Weaver and Harold Weinert will serve as pallbearers for the funeral of Mrs. Marion Crook to be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at St. Thomas' Episcopal church here. Mrs. Crook died Monday at the Masonic home at Plattsmouth.

The Rev. Charles Frandsen will conduct the service. Burial will be in Steele cemetery.

The body of Mrs. Crook is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home.


The Falls City Journal, April, 1966

Ray F. Crook, 70, Dies at FC Hospital

Ray F. Crook, 70, 2121 Harlan street, died at 5:15 o'clock Sunday morning, Apr. 24, 1966 at Community hospital here. Mr. Crook had been in failing health for the past year. He had been worse the last six months, and was bedfast and hospitalized most of the time the last three months. He entered the hospital the last time Apr. 15.

Mr. Crook was born Oct. 11, 1895, near Salem, a son of the late Benjamin and Alvada Harris Crook. He had lived much of his life on the same farm, where his son, Leo Crook, and family now live. The Crook family received the pioneer award for having the farm in their family for more than 100 years. Mr. Crook lived for a few years near Plattsmouth and moved into Falls City, in 1948 from the Salem farm.

He was married to Miss Etta Burgett in April of 1915 at Pawnee City. The couple was divorced in 1947 and he was married the second time to Mrs. Edith Ferron on Sept. 18, 1948, at Plattsmouth.

Besides his widow, Mr. Crook is survived by two sons, Leo Crook, Salem, and Don Crook, Parkville, Mo.; two step-children, Mrs. Garth Massey, Livingston, Mont., and Sgt. Gary F. Ferron, special services in the U. S. Army in Viet Nam; four sisters, Mrs. Louis Wittwer, Falls City, Mrs. Hugh Sander, Plattsmouth, Mrs. Carl Windrum, Gothenburg, and Mrs. Herbert Aistrup, Sioux Falls, S. D.; four grandchildren and seven step-grandchildren. A son died in infancy.

The body of Mr. Crook is here at the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home and funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon in their chapel, conducted by the Rev. Donald F. Hood. Interment will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, April 26, 1966

Crook Funeral Rites Held at Funeral Home

Frank Dopp, L. H. Weaver, Merle Stalder and Leo Burgett, all of Falls City; Clyde Fairbanks, Dawson, and Kenneth Wittwer, Sabetha, served as pallbearers for the funeral of Ray F. Crook held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon here in the chapel of the Dorr-Philpot and Reavis-Macomber funeral home. Mr. Crook died Sunday afternoon.

The Rev. Donald F. Hood conducted the services. Interment was in Steele cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, May 30, 1973

George A. Goolsby dies in St. Joseph

George A. Goolsby, 65, Reserve, died at 8:50 p. m. Tuesday, May 29, 1973, at the Methodist Medical Clinic in St. Joseph, which he entered May 13.  He had been in failing health for a year.

Mr. Goolsby was born June 9, 1907, three miles southeast of Verdon, a son of the late Grant Goolsby and Eliza Allison Goolsby.  He was reared at Verdon and attended Verdon high school.

Mr. Goolsby was engaged in farming until he took employment with the Missouri Pacific railroad.  He was employed on the Omaha division of the railroad for 43 years and was retired June 9, 1972, as an engineer.

Apr. 1, 1959, he was married to Mrs. Virginia Lindstrom Cox at Lexington, Mo., and they moved to Reserve that year and had lived there since.  He had served on the city council at Reserve and was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.

Besides his wife, Mr. Goolsby is survived by a step-daughter, Mrs. Billy J. (Bonnie) Jadwin, Reserve; two sisters, Mrs. B. F. Randall, Verdon, and Miss Alice Goolsby, Falls City; five step-grandsons and two step-great-grandchildren.  Three brothers and a sister preceded him in death.

The body of Mr. Goolsby is here at the Dorr Funeral Home.  Funeral services will be held in their chapel at 2 p. m. Friday, conducted by the Rev. Harold Wolf of Hiawatha.   Interment will be in the Cornelius cemetery at Reserve.


The Falls City Journal, October, 1974

Dr. Guy H. Crook Dies in Washington

A native of Falls City, Dr. Guy H. Crook, 60, Kennewick, Wash., died at 5:20 p. m. Monday, Sept. 30. He had practiced medicine here.

The body of Dr. Crook will be brought here to the Dorr Funeral Home for funeral services which are pending.


The Falls City Journal, October, 1974

Graveside Service Friday for Dr. Crook

A graveside service for Dr. Guy H. Crook, 60, Kennewick, Wash., who died Monday at a hospital in Richland, Wash., will be held at 11 o'clock Friday morning here in Steele cemetery conducted by Father Carl E. Gockley.

The body of Dr. Crook will arrive in Kansas City at 8:52 tonight by air and will be brought here by the Dorr Funeral Home.

Dr. Crook was born Sept. 10, 1914, at Minneapolis, Minn., a son of the late Guy A. Crook and Florence Harman Crook. He was married to Miss Lorraine Lynn, formerly of Falls City, June 8, 1940, in Kansas City.

Dr. Crook practiced medicine in Falls City until moving to Kennewick in 1957.

He was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church at Kennewick.

Besides his wife, Dr. Crook is survived by three sons, Guy H. (Bing) Crook, San Antonio, Tex., Robert Crook, Kennewick, and William Crook, Cheney, Wash., and seven grandchildren. His parents and a brother, William H. Crook, preceded him in death.


The Falls City Journal, September, 1978

Charles Whitaker Dies Tuesday

Charles P. Whitaker, 84, a resident of Ketter Manor, died at 11:50 a. m. Tuesday, Sept. 12, 1978, at the Veterans Hospital in Lincoln, where he had been a patient for two weeks.

Mr. Whitaker had been in failing health for the last several years.

A native of Oskaloosa, Kan., Mr. Whitaker was a son of the late John (Gid) Gideon Whitaker and Martha (Mattie) Nutter Whitaker. He moved to Falls City when he was young.

He was married to Pearle Henderson May 14, 1923, in Falls City. He had lived all of his adult life in Falls City and worked for the Missouri Pacific Railroad until his retirement in 1956.

Mr. Whitaker was a member of the First Christian Church here and a member of the American Legion Post No. 102.

Surviving are his wife of Ketter Manor, a daughter, Mrs. Reuben (Dorothea) Metzger, Rulo, two grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Fred Whitaker.

The funeral will be held at 10 a. m. Friday here in the chapel of Chaney-Hodgens-Clark Funeral Home, conducted by the Rev. Roger F. Miller. Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, September, 1978

Whitaker Rites Here on Friday

Pallbearers have been chosen for the funeral of Charles P. Whitaker to be held at 10 a. m. Friday here in the chapel of Chaney-Hodgens-Clark Funeral Home.

Mr. Whitaker died Tuesday.

Pallbearers will be Reuben Metzger, Rulo; Dr. John Metzger, Hiawatha; Russell Rebman, Lenexa, Kan.; William D. Hodgens, Vern Ketter and Clarence Nutter, all of Falls City.

The Rev. Roger F. Miller will conduct the funeral. Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.

Mr. Whitaker, a World War I veteran, entered the army Sept. 5, 1918, at Falls City, and was discharged on March 19, 1919, at Camp Funston, Kan.


The Falls City Journal, June, 1980

Mrs. Whitaker, 82, Passes Away Here

Mrs. Pearle Whitaker, 82, a resident of Ketter Manor, died there Sunday afternoon, July 13, 1980. She had been in failing health the past seven years.

Mrs. Whitaker was born June 17, 1898, in Beatrice, a daughter of Robert Henderson and Edith Sherbourne Henderson. She married Charles P. Whitaker on May 14, 1923, in Falls City, where they established their home. Mrs. Whitaker was a registered nurse and had worked at the Falls City Community Hospital. She retired in 1939.

She was a member of the First Christian Church.

Mrs. Whitaker is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Reuben (Dorothea) Metzger, Falls City; one grandson, Dr. John Metzger, Hiawatha; one granddaughter, Mrs. Russell Rebman, Lenexa, Kan., two great grandchildren, David and Caroline Metzger, Hiawatha; two sisters, Mrs. W. R. (Grace) Williams and Mrs. Hallie (Gladys) Noah, both of Falls City, and two brothers, Glenn Henderson, Eskridge, Kan., and Laurence Henderson, Anaheim, Calif. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, one sister and one brother.

The body of Mrs. Whitaker is at the Chaney-Hodgens-Clark Funeral Home where services will be held in the chapel at 10 a. m. Wednesday with the Father Max Kors officiating. Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, June, 1980

Select Pallbearers for Whitaker Rites

Pallbearers for the funeral service of Mrs. Pearle Whitaker will be Russell Rebman, Lenexa, Kan.; Dr. John Metzger, Hiawatha; Reuben Metzger, Rulo; Vern Ketter, Clarence Nutter and Erwin Harkendorff, all of Falls City.

Mrs. Whitaker passed away at Ketter Manor on July 13.

Services will be held in the Chaney-Hodgens-Clark Funeral Home Chapel at 10 a. m. Wednesday with the Father Max Kors officiating. Burial will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, August 4, 1981

Bennett Weaver Passes Away Here

Bennett Weaver, 76, Ketter Manor, died at 12:58 a.m. today, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 1981, at Community Hospital.

He had entered the hospital on July 4.

He was born Oct. 21, 1904, at Cordell, Okla., a son of the late Paul B. Weaver and Anna C. Crook Weaver. He came to Falls City with his parents in 1905 and had lived here since.

Mr. Weaver was a member of the First United Methodist Church.

Survivors include two brothers, Archibald J. Weaver and Lawrence M. Weaver, both of Falls City; four sisters, Mrs. Ed (Martha) Weir, Lincoln, Mrs. Lloyd (Mary Ann) Neil, Lexington, Mrs. Has (Christobel) Welch, Grand Island, and Mrs. William V. (Doris) Glenn, San Antonio, Texas.

The body is at the Dorr Funeral Home.

Interment will be at Steele Cemetery with private graveside services.


The Falls City Journal, December 11, 1981

Carl R. Crook dies in Humboldt

Carl R. Crook, 90, rural Salem, passed away at 2:30 a.m. today, Friday, Dec. 11, 1981, at the Humboldt Community Hospital, where he had entered Wednesday due to a stroke.

He was born June 22, 1891, southwest of Salem, a son of the late B. F. Crook and Molly E. McKinney Crook. His parents passed away when he was small, and he was raised by his grandmother, Amy Wharton at Morrill, Kan. He attended Peru State Normal College and sang in the glee club while there.

He married Ethel Coon Sept. 3, 1912, at Salem. They established their home west of Falls City in the Salem area. They were later divorced. He continued to live in the Salem area. He married Kathleen (Katie) Cox Feb. 5, 1942, at Oregon, Mo. They made their home at the present farm home and have lived there since.

Mr. Crook was a retired farmer, having raised purebred Shorthorn cattle and purebred Poland China hogs during his years of farming.

Survivors include his wife of the home and nephews and nieces.

He was preceded in death by two brothers, Emery Crook and Stanley (Jack) Crook, and a sister, Clara Crook.

The body is at the Dorr Funeral Home were services will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m. Monday with the Rev. Ward Merritt of Humboldt officiating. Interment will be in the Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, December 14, 1981

Carl Crook funeral held this afternoon

Wilbur Leafty, Merle Smith, Orville Ruegge, Lester Ebel, Jack Davidson and Harold Suedmeier, all of Falls City, served as pallbearers at the funeral for Carl R. Crook.

Services were held this afternoon in the chapel of the Dorr Funeral Home with the Rev. Ward Merritt, Humboldt, officiating. Interment was in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, November, 1983

Janet Weaver passes away Monday

Janet (Mrs. Lawrence M.) Weaver, 72, 2407 Barada street, passed away at Community Hospital at 6:48 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28, 1983.

She became ill Monday afternoon at her home, suffered a massive heart attach and was taken to the hospital by Falls City Volunteer Ambulance at 5:10 p.m. She had had a heart condition since 1977.

A daughter of the late Charles and Elda Barr Wurzbacher, she was born Oct. 23, 1911, at Colome, S. D. She and her family moved from Colome to West Point. She attended schools in West Point except for her senior year in high school. She graduated from Lingel, Wyo., High School in 1929. The family had moved there in 1928 and then back to West Point.

She attended nurses’ training at the former Nicholas Sinn Hospital in Omaha. On Oct. 23, 1933, she married Lawrence M. Weaver in Lincoln. They established their home in Scribner and moved to a farm north of Salem in 1936. The moved into Falls City in 1960 and to the present home in 1966.

Mrs. Weaver was a member of the Congregational Church at Verdon and the Women’s Fellowship of the church.

Survivors include her husband, Lawrence M. Weaver Sr.; Falls City; two sons, Lawrence M. Weaver Jr., Falls City and Paul B. Weaver, Toledo Ore.; a sister, Mrs. Betty Baumann, Rimforest, Calif.; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by a son, Donald C. Weaver, March 25, 1960, a brother and a sister.

The body is at Dorr Funeral Home and services will be held in the chapel at 11 a.m. Thursday with the Rev. Paul Weinert officiating. Interment will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, November, 1983

Pallbearers for Weaver funeral

Michael Weaver, Douglas Weaver, Randy Scott and David Feek, all of Falls City, David R. Weaver, Bellvue, and Benjamin Welch, Lincoln, will serve as pallbearers at the funeral of Janet (Mrs. Lawrence) Weaver.

Service will be held Thursday morning at 11 o’clock in the chapel of the Dorr Funeral Home and will be conducted by the Rev. Paul Weinert. Interment will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, May, 1985

Larry Weaver dies Sunday

Lawrence M. (Larry) Weaver, 73, 2407 Barada street, passed away at his home at 10:32 p.m. Sunday, May 12, 1985.

Mr. Weaver operated and was co-owner of the Falls City Farm and City Supply at 15th and Stone from 1960 until 1979.

He had been in failing health the past five years.

A son of the late Paul B. Weaver and Anna C. Crook Weaver, he was born Sept. 10, 1911, at Falls City. He was raised here and graduated from Falls City High School in 1929. He attended the University of Nebraska and took employment in Scribner with the Scribner Lumber and Grain Co. from 1932 until 1936.

He married Janet Wurzbacher Oct. 23, 1933, at Lincoln. They established their home in Scribner and moved to a farm north of Salem in 1936. They moved into Falls City in 1960. Mrs. Weaver died Nov. 28, 1983.

He was a member of the BPO Elks Lodge No. 963, the Falls City Lions Club and was active in the Chamber of Commerce while in business.

Survivors include two sons, Lawrence M. Weaver Jr., Falls City, and Paul B. Weaver, Toledo, Ore.; a brother, Archibald J. Weaver, Falls City; four sisters, Martha (Mrs. Ed) Weir, Lincoln, Mary Ann (Mrs. Lloyd) Neil, Lexington, Christobel (Mrs. Hal) Welch, Grand Island, and Doris (Mrs. William) Glenn, San Antonio, Texas; seven grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

A son, Donald C. Weaver, preceded him in death on March 25, 1960, as did a brother, Bennett Weaver, on Aug. 4, 1981.

The body is at the Dorr funeral Home pending arrangements.


The Falls City Journal, May, 1985

Weaver service to be Friday morning

Funeral arrangements have been completed for Lawrence (Larry) Weaver.

Services will be held Friday morning at 11 o’clock in the chapel of the Dorr Funeral Home and will be conducted by the Rev. Paul Weinert.

Interment will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, May, 1985

Pallbearers for Weaver service

Pallbearers have been selected to serve at the funeral for Lawrence (Larry) Weaver Sr.

The will include Michael Weaver, Douglas Weaver, Randy Scott and David Feek, all of Falls City, William V. Glenn Jr., Torrance, Calif., and Benjamin Welch, Lincoln.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday in the chapel of the Dorr Funeral Home and will be conducted by the Rev. Paul Weinert. Interment will be in Steele Cemetery.


The Falls City Journal, April 29, 1994

Lorraine L. Crook

A service of Inurnment was held Thursday morning at Steele Cemetery for Lorraine Lynn Crook, 76, a former local resident, who died March 18, 1994, at Kennewick, Wash. Fr. Carl Roos officiated.

Mrs. Crook was born Feb. 14, 1918, in Chicago Ill., the daughter of William A. and Martha J. Lynn. She lived in Falls City during her high school years and was graduated from Falls City High in 1936. She was graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1940.

She returned to Falls City in 1952 with her husband, Guy A. Crook, M.D., and her three sons. the lived here until 1957 when they moved to Kennewick.

Mrs. Crook was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, and a sister, Marguerite Hartford.

She is survived by three sons, Guy H. Crook, Hawaii; Robert L. Crook, and William A. Crook, both of Kennewick; eight grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

Last updated August 07, 1999
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